Image courtesy US Navy/General Dynamics Bath Iron Works/Michael C. Nutter

Image courtesy US Navy/General Dynamics Bath Iron Works/Michael C. Nutter

Due to the US government shutdown over the past few weeks, the christening of the US Navy and General Dynamics-Bath Iron Works’ latest creation, DDG 1000 (soon to be USS Zumwalt) was unfortunately put on hold.

The good news is, Bath Iron Works shipyard, located in the great state of Maine – home of lobsters, pine trees, and Shipyard Ale – released the following images of this incredible ship, with lines that probably haven’t been seen on a ship since the 19th century.

Image courtesy US Navy/General Dynamics Bath Iron Works/Michael C. Nutter

Image courtesy US Navy/General Dynamics Bath Iron Works/Michael C. Nutter

Image courtesy US Navy/General Dynamics Bath Iron Works/Michael C. Nutter

Image courtesy US Navy/General Dynamics Bath Iron Works/Michael C. Nutter

Image courtesy US Navy/General Dynamics Bath Iron Works/Michael C. Nutter

Image courtesy US Navy/General Dynamics Bath Iron Works/Michael C. Nutter

Don’t let the reverse sheer on this ship fool you though. Underneath its composite deckhouse (yes, that’s right) is the most sophisticated surface warfare battle suite ever installed on a warship that is tied into an array of weapon systems, including (but not limited to) twenty MK 57 vertical launch modules and a pair of 155 mm guns.

These guns have water-cooled barrels capable of hitting targets up to 83 nautical miles away at 10 rounds per minute.

Image courtesy US Navy/General Dynamics Bath Iron Works/Michael C. Nutter

Image courtesy US Navy/General Dynamics Bath Iron Works/Michael C. Nutter

Image courtesy US Navy/General Dynamics Bath Iron Works/Michael C. Nutter

Image courtesy US Navy/General Dynamics Bath Iron Works/Michael C. Nutter

This 600-foot, $3.3 BILLION warship is powered by a pair of Rolls-Royce Marine Trent-30 gas turbines.

Image courtesy US Navy/General Dynamics Bath Iron Works/Michael C. Nutter

Image courtesy US Navy/General Dynamics Bath Iron Works/Michael C. Nutter

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    • Capncraigagain

      If the “Sea of Dispare” is little, I’m curious what proportion “Colossal” holds.

  • Dominic Hix

    The bow is reminiscent of early battleship & cruiser bows at the turn of the 19th & 20th centuries.

  • Capt. Geest

    Seeing her “in the flesh” and not on the drawing board, I can’t help be feel like they made a mistake putting a sonar dome on the bow. They should have gone with a Roman Trireme-style ram!

    • Billy Badass

      Citing anything that begins with Ayn Rand totally invalidates any point you try to make.

      • C.P.T.L.

        Billy Badass – “Citing anything that begins with Ayn Rand totally invalidates any point you try to make.”

        LOL, too true, but…

        It would be a shame to pass over her first book in particular, and, if one is an artist, the second book.

        Rand’s first, ‘We The Living’ was not the finest writing, but not terrible: it was her best novel and a worthy story.

        Rand’s second book ‘The Fountainhead’ was not the finest writing and was a flawed novel, a bit melodramatic and long, but was a worthy story, particularly for a young artist.

        The first dealt with personal integrity, and the second dealt with artistic integrity.

        The books that followed are where Rand falls apart: she attempted to project and expand her ideas onto economics and politics, and failed as an artist and philosopher.

    • Miskit

      General Dynamics IS a public company listed on the New York Stock exchange.
      (I wish all those people who swear about Ayn Rand’s books were smart enough to see through all the holes in her philosophy.)

  • Watson

    So gigantic for a warship!! No other vessel can compare to this bad’ass: http://www.nauticexpo.com/cat/ships/special-vessels-patrol-vessels-AG-1552.html

  • Carl

    Very rarely do I wish I was still on active duty, but pictures like these make me wish I was…

  • Anonymous

    Asked this in the Ford pictures but got no response…Question from a non-sailor: What is the reason for the different paint colors at the waterline (black) and below (red)?

    • MQuinn

      The red is anti-fouling paint, to prevent the buildup of barnacles and/or limit corrosion in a metal hull.

    • Ted K.

      The black band marks the load limits area. If she’s fully laden the black band won’t be visible. If she’s empty, w/o fuel or ammo, you might see some of the red, anti-fouling paint. The ship’s draft will also vary due to salinity and temperature.

    • Jerry Casaday

      We’ll need a small deposit before we give you the keys, because unlike VW, we don’t have a ‘sign and drive’ program.

  • BBG

    DDG-1000 was suppose to replace the Iowa Class Battleships. It does not even come close and cost 9 Billion dollars for that 1 Ship including the R&D. Where as Modernizing the Iowa’s would have cost 1 Billion for 2 Iowa’s. Read the Study below and you will see that the Iowa’s bring a whole lot more to the warfighter than the DDG1000.

    http://www.usnfsa.org/getTRDoc.pdf

    • NH Apache

      Read page 154 of your cited document. It states the fallacies of the 16 inch are both accuracy and fire rate. Much of the 9 billion was engineering for the vessel. The new hull form will allow a much faster transit time to battle as well.

      I remember 13 years ago when I saw it on paper. Now that it is finally realized, we’ll see a serious drop in cost and time to manufacture.

      • BBG

        I think you are citing a Navy Position against battleships which usually proves to be Navy BS. This study PROVES 100% that the DDG1000 is a total waste of Money and does little to nothing for NSFS.

        From pg 154. of the adobe PDF

        The following statement was the position of the Director, Gun Division, Naval
        Sea Systems Command in the 1980s

        “By reactivating the 16-inch turrets the Navy has obtained a highly capable weapon system, which can engage a wide range of surface targets in all weather conditions for a long period of time better than any other system the Navy has in the Fleet. Even in peacetime the 16-inch turrets on the battleships provide an impressive naval presence.”

      • BBG

        Also NH APACHE

        USS Wisconsin crossed the Atlantic in 4 days. Norfolk to Spain in 4 Days oh by the way it went right straight through a Hurricane. A sea state 5. DDG1000 will run from a Sea State 4. I would bet an Iowa is faster and more maneuverable than the DDG-1000. Because of the Iowa’s Rudder Design. Bet you didn’t know the Iowa can stop from 32 Knot to 0 in under 800 ft Full Reverse and closing the barn doors on the rudders. USS Wisconsin did this in the 80’s.

        Full Speed Ahead and Crash Stops on Iowa Battleships

        By Dick Landsgraff

        Updated 06 January 2000

        Well, I’ve been on a couple of sea trials where we cranked her up 10 rpm every ten minutes.

        That’s EACH shaft increasing another 10 rpm. That’s EACH 18-ton propeller increasing another 10 rpm.

        The skipper usually held out at a maximum of 200 rpm for the required 2-hour hold. However, the machinery was capable of kicking up another 10 or 15 rpm. But 31 to 32 knots was sufficient for the high-speed tests.

        When the ship got up to 26 knots, a rooster tail would start to appear. Vibration was reported, but only aft of frame 166 (where the aft transverse armored bulkhead is). Chief’s quarters were pretty bouncy and the Nixie room was like standing on a jackhammer. I set my notebook down on a table to record some data and you can barely make out my handwriting.

        Walking forward, the vibration almost totally disappears as soon as you cross the threshold at frame 166. By the time you get up near the anchor windlass room, you can feel a slight torque to the bow. An almost imperceptible twisting that can only be felt by people with excellent sense of balance. I think it was that twisting that caused hairline cracks in the upper outboard corners of bulkhead 36 and allowed fuel to leak into the storeroom. Identical cracks were found on 3 of the 4 ships.

        Once the crew accidentally hosed me down when I stepped out onto the weather deck. They were washing down the teak and I was within range. But I just walked up to the bulwark on the bow, forward of the anchors, and let that 30+ knot headwind dry me off in a few minutes.

        The high speed turns can shake you up a bit. New Jersey was riding very light and heeled quite a bit. Missouri was ballasted a little better (plus having bilge keels in better shape) and heeling was almost unnoticeable.

        A full crash back is almost a non-event. That’s where all four screws are reversed from full ahead to full astern. It takes a little over a mile for the ship to come to a stop before going in reverse, but there is no feeling of inertia throwing you forward – unless you turn the rudders inboard toward each other to close off the passage of water between the twin keels. That is called a “Barn Door Stop” and only the Wisconsin has ever tested it. A former XO of Whisky said that when they threw a piece of wood over the side from the bow at the onset of that maneuver, the ship came to a stop with that wood no further aft than turret III. That’s stopping a 57,000 ton ship traveling at 33 knots in about 600 feet, which means that anything that is not tied down winds up on deck or against a forward bulkhead.

        Of the four BB’s we reactivated in the 80’s, the Wisconsin had the most problems with loose rudders. I wonder why. But Philadelphia did a great job of tightening them back up again.

      • Kirk

        “Now that it is finally realized, we’ll see a serious drop in cost and time to manufacture.”

        Looks like they’re building only three of them.

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advanced_Gun_System

        “The shortening of Zumwalt procurement to three ships increases the likelihood that BAE will attempt to market AGS to other programs.”

    • Miskit

      The sixteen-inch guns were rendered functionally useless by 5-inch precision guided munitions, which have pinpoint accuracy, equal or better range, and a much smaller launch platform.
      Plus, imagine all the corner reflectors on a WWII era battleship: one small radar guided missile would light up an old battlewagon like the Christmas Tree on Times Square.

      • BBG

        Miskit you clearly have no clue what you are talking about Read the Study I linked above. There is no 5″ guided round. Its to costly and lack Lethality. The Study won Best Thesis Award from the National Defense University.

        • Jerry Casaday

          Miskit should ask a mud Marine if he thinks 16 inch guns are obsolete.

  • Paul W. Gibbs

    Um….at the risk of being a killjoy…..Where’s the window? :)

  • David

    I wonder how long it will take before the first CO forgets that he/she has 50+ foot of ship forward of the bow, below the water line, and crushes the sonar dome on a pier.

  • Roland

    That bow is apparently designed to cut through the waves instead of rising above them. It’s a submarine, apparently. Or it will meet heavy weather and disappear. What a waste. But hey, it’s radar-stealthy, and these days that’s what matters, right?

  • WhatThe

    Does anyone know what they do to handle anchors around that bow, we hear its a problem on all the yachts with this kind of exaggerated shape

    • David

      Curious as to where they are. Looking at the pictures I cant see any signs of them up near the bow.

      • Charles

        I wouldn’t be surprised if there are no anchors. Dynamic positioning has gotten to the point, even in the private sector, that unless you’re planning on spending a lot of time on the hook, You’ll probably never drop it.

      • Mike

        Anchor is underneath the ship. Mooring stations along the sides of the ship have hydraulically operated doors that are flush with the hull when they’re closed.

    • Miskit

      Every modern ship has a bulbous bow – even cruise ships.

      • CaptStan

        They are removing bulbous bows from some ships obviously speed related- she has this ‘bulb’ to house the Sonar which as been mentioned. The bow shape called a wave piercer – there are a number of passenger Cats supporting the same design.

    • Noel

      Turbines are powered by diesel, Jet A fuel is aviation grade diesel.

  • jason

    3.3 billion for 1 in a time like this good luck America

  • Jack Mehoff

    Wake up dopes, that huge superstructure is constructed from carbon fiber fabric, balsa wood, synthetic foam and resin. yeah, that’s gonna hold up nicely to hostile fire. And you better hope you’re not on it when that hull takes a swell from the stern. $3.3 billion wasted dollars. the last I heard Al Qaeda does not have a navy.

  • modor

    The anchor drops strait out of the bottom of the boat between gun 1 and 2

  • Kirk

    Interesting, that the USN suddenly finds a need to have a gun bigger than a 5-inch. Are they just spending money to spend money, or are they starting to worry that our carriers won’t survive a modern naval battle?

    As for the ship itself, they could have achieved the same thing with just building a modernized WW2 cruiser. Take a ship like CA-44 (link below). Replace the steam engines with diesels, replace one of the three 8″ turrets with VLS, add a sonar dome, and you’re 90% of the way there.

    I don’t know why this costs three billion to accomplish.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Vincennes_(CA-44)

    • Miskit

      You might want to take a look at a thirty-year old Aegis cruiser or destroyer – pretty much the ship your looking for.

  • Austin

    I feel like I could shave with that bow. Such an insane edge!

  • Allen Spano

    Naming a ship after one of the biggest pricks the Navy has ever seen could prove to be a mistake.

  • Noel

    did any of you morons see that it cost “US”, thats me and you over 3 BILLION dollars? and all you laminate about is how awesome and majestic it is?

  • http://www.economic-undertow.com steve from virginia

    Total waste of money, the Coast Guard has funding trouble but not the gold-plated shipyards.

    Ships like this are obsolete: speedboats + explosives and this ship is gone.

  • Z54

    Just another great waste of the taxpayers money!

    • J Roselle

      Looks like a gaming center.

  • J Roselle

    OPERATORS WANTED: Must be adept at Sony Game Boy or similar, using both hands. Should have fast thumbs.

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