Skandi Aker Apparently Not-So-Awesome as Total Cancels $250 Million Contract

Skandi Aker
Skanki Aker, Photo: Harald Valderhaug/AkerSolutions

With utilization of only 37 percent so far this year due to maintenance and repairs, Total has had enough of the Skandi Aker, a 2010-built well intervention and subsea construction vessel that was hailed as the “Ship of the Year” at the SMM Hamburg convention in 2010.

Aker Oilfield Services was notified today that their 2-year, $250 million contract with Total has been officially been terminated, and with that, the remaining $150 million balance of their contract which had commenced last September off Angola.

Under the original contract with Total, the Skandi Aker was to perform subsea intervention activities related to:

  • Well re-entry for testing operations
  • Well re-entry for interventions using wireline, coil tubing and well stimulations
  • Running/lifting subsea trees with cable or work-over riser
  • Suspension or plug and abandonment of wells

Aker Oilfield Services, a subsidiary of Aker Solutions had no further comment about what specifically had gone wrong with the vessel however.

About the vessel:

LOA: 157 meters

Beam: 27 meters

DWT: 16942 tons

Crane: 400-t0n AHC

Engines:

  • (2) 8L 32/40 MAN engines, each capable of generating 3,740kW at 720rpm,
  • (4) 6L 32/40 MAN engines, each capable of generating 2,805kW at 720rpm.
  • Gensets: (2)  Siemens 1 DK 4s and (4) Siemens 1 FJ 4s

Accommodations: 140 persons

When built in 2010, the DNV-classed Skandi Aker was the largest monhull well intervention vessel ever built and the first such vessel to classified according to DNV’s WELL-Notation, meaning the vessel is able to take oil on board.  This allows it to perform well-testing and clean-up, flaring off hydrocarbons through a flare at the stern. Aker Solutions notes on their website the vessel can also perform through-tube rotary drilling with coil and downhole motor, and managed-pressure drilling.

The ship was built at STX Norway Offshore’s yard in Søviknes, Norway (now VARD) and is owned  by DOFCON ASA, a subsidiary of DOF.