Norfolk Naval Shipyard Needs to Fill 1,500 Civilian Worker Positions

A shipyard worker bevels a rudder deck patch aboard the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). Dwight D. Eisenhower is currently undergoing a scheduled docking planned incremental availability (DPIA) at Norfolk Naval Shipyard. U.S. Navy Photo
A shipyard worker bevels a rudder deck patch aboard the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) at Norfolk Naval Shipyard. U.S. Navy Photo

The Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Virginia is looking to hire about 1,500 civilian workers over the next year amid an increased workload and a growing number of retirees.

Jeffrey Cunningham, a spokesman for the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, one of the largest shipyards in the world specializing in repairing, overhauling and modernizing ships and submarines, told local media that the shipyard is set to lose more than 700 employees to attrition, mainly retirement, and that the hiring spree is largely focussed on expanding the yard’s 4-year apprentice program.

In total, the Norfolk Naval Shipyard will be looking to fill approximately 1,500 jobs across more than 20 shipbuilding and repair trades by the end of September 2015, according to reports.

In an interview with local WAVY.com, Norfolk Naval Shipyard Commander Capt. Scott M. Brown noted that while past experience is required for most of the technical jobs, the only requirements for the apprentice program are a high school diploma or GED, the ability to pass a physical exam and security clearance.

The jobs are and will be made available on the website, USAjobs.gov.