Ship Photos of the Day – 15 Great Photos of the USS Zumwalt in Baltimore

The Navy's newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000), is moored to the pier during a commissioning ceremony at North Locust Point in Baltimore. U.S. Navy Photo
The Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000), is moored to the pier during a commissioning ceremony at North Locust Point in Baltimore. U.S. Navy Photo

As you may have heard the U.S. Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced destroyer, USS Zumwalt, was commissioned into service in Baltimore this past weekend while in town for the city’s Fleet Week festivities. 

U.S. Navy Photo
U.S. Navy Photo

Zumwalt is the lead ship of a new class of next-generation multi-mission destroyers, featuring a state-of-the-art electric propulsion system, wave-piercing tumblehome hull, stealth design, and the latest warfighting technology and weaponry available.  

161017-N-NU281-026 BALTIMORE (Oct. 17, 2016) The guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) passes national historic site Fort McHenry as she departs Maryland Fleet Week and Air Show Baltimore (MDFWASB). MDFWASB provides the people and media of the greater Maryland/Baltimore area an opportunity to interact with Sailors and Marines, as well as see, firsthand, the latest capabilities of today's maritime services. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Justin R. Pacheco/Released)
The guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) passes national historic site Fort McHenry as she departs Maryland Fleet Week and Air Show Baltimore (MDFWASB). U.S. Navy Photo
U.S. Navy Photo
U.S. Navy Photo
U.S. Navy Photo
U.S. Navy Photo

The USS Zumwalt was built at General Dynamics Bath Iron Works shipyard in Bath, Maine. Construction on the destroyer began more than 7 years ago in February 2009.

U.S. Navy Photo
U.S. Navy Photo

Displacing more than 15,000 tons, the Zumwalt is by far bigger than approximately 9,200 ton Arleigh Burke-class destroyers that preceded it.

U.S. Navy Photo
U.S. Navy Photo

The Navy says the 610-foot, wave-piercing tumblehome hull design, a throwback to early battleships, provides a wide array of advancements. The shape of the superstructure and the arrangement of its antennas significantly reduces radar cross section, making the ship less visible to enemy radar at sea.

161017-N-CE233-184 CHESAPEAKE BAY, Md. (Oct. 17, 2016) USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) approaches the Gov. William Preston Lane Memorial Bridge, also known as the Chesapeake Bay Bridge, as the ship travels to its new home port of San Diego, California. Zumwalt was commissioned in Baltimore, Maryland, Oct. 15 and is the first in a three-ship class of the Navy's newest, most technologically advanced multi-mission guided-missile destroyers. (U.S. Navy photo by Liz Wolter/Released)
USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) approaches the Gov. William Preston Lane Memorial Bridge, also known as the Chesapeake Bay Bridge, as the ship travels to its new home port of San Diego, California. U.S. Navy Photo
U.S. Navy Photo
U.S. Navy Photo

U.S. Navy Photo

U.S. Navy Photo

According to the Navy, the USS Zumwalt is tailored for sustained operations in the littorals and land attack, and will provide independent forward presence and deterrence, support special operations forces, and operate as an integral part of joint and combined expeditionary forces.

U.S. Navy Photo
U.S. Navy Photo
U.S. Navy Photo
U.S. Navy Photo

The (estimated $3 to $4 billion) destroyer is now headed for its homeport of San Diego where it will begin installation of its combat systems, more testing, and evaluations before Zumwalt is integrated with the rest of the Navy fleet.

U.S. Navy Photo
U.S. Navy Photo
U.S. Navy Photo
U.S. Navy Photo

The U.S. Navy is also planning two more Zumwalt-class ships, both of which are already under construction at Bath Iron Works.