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Höegh Autoliners Joins First Movers Coalition

Mike Schuler
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October 6, 2022

Norwegian roll-on/roll-off shipping company Höegh Autoliners has joined the First Movers Coalition, a initiative led jointly by the World Economic Forum and the U.S. Government to accelerated decarbonization in hard-to-abate sectors such as heavy industry and long-distance transport.

In joining the coalition, Höegh Autoliners has committed to running at least 5 % of its deep sea operations on either green ammonia or green methanol by 2030.

More than 50 companies including Ford Motor Company, Volvo Group, Aker ASA, Yara International, Amazon and A.P. Moller–Maersk now make up the coalition to help commercialize zero-carbon technologies. Höegh Autoliners is now the first member representing the ro/ro shipping sector.

“I am delighted to announce that we have joined the First Movers Coalition. This is a proud moment for our company and a decisive step on our path to zero and our ambitious target of being carbon neutral by 2040,” says Höegh Autoliners CEO Andreas Enger.

“Through our Aurora new building program, we firmly believe we will be able to meet or exceed the aim of having 5% of our deep sea operation on carbon neutral fuels, and we encourage both our customers and competitors to also join the FMC. The quest for a greener future is more important than ever, and something we must all contribute to,” Enger adds.

The First Movers Coalition was launched during COP-26 in Glasgow in November 2021 and was initiated by the US State Department, through Special Presidential Envoy for Climate John Kerry, and the World Economic Forum.

“We are very happy to welcome Höegh Autoliners into the coalition. The shipping industry is an important focus for FMC, and as sustainability frontrunners within their sector, we believe Höegh Autoliners has a lot to bring to the First Movers Coalition,” says Nancy Gillis, Head of the First Movers Coalition. “We look forwarding to working together to decarbonize supply chains and secure a genuine net-zero transition.”

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