Antipode Maps: The Far Side of the World

This map shows the antipodes of each point on the Earth's surface – the points where the blue and pink overlap are land antipodes. Notice that most land has an antipode in the ocean.  This map uses the Lambert azimuthal equal-area projection.

This map shows the antipodes of each point on the Earth‘s surface – the points where the blue and pink overlap are land antipodes. Notice that most land has an antipode in the ocean. This map uses the Lambert azimuthal equal-area projection.

This map shows the antipodes of each point on the Earth’s surface – the points where the blue and pink overlap are land antipodes. Notice that most land has an antipode in the ocean. This map uses the Lambert azimuthal equal-area projection.

This map shows the antipodes of each point on the Earth’s surface – the points where the blue and pink overlap are land antipodes. Darker shades indicate areas of higher population density. This map uses the Equirectangular projection.

As a kid I wondered where I’d end up if I could drill a hole all the way through the earth. The answer was always China. That was before I knew the concept of Latitude and Longitude.

Thanks to the net, it’s much easier to make the calculation today. It is interesting to note that very little of the earths land mass overlaps.

Any number of Anitpode map links can make the calculation for you.
Wikipedia info here. You can create your own.

For the hooked on trivia buffs, here’s Wendy Carols’ Map Page.
(Ed. note: If you’re of my vintage you may remember Wendy’s (aka Walter) 1968 synthesizer classic Hooked on Bach.

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This post was written by Richard Rodriguez, Rescue Tug Captain, and US Coast Guard approved instructor for License Training. You can read more of his articles at the BitterEnd of the net.