The figurehead of the Coast Guard cutter Eagle is seen on a foggy Sunday morning at the Coast Guard Yard, Baltimore, Md., Nov. 17, 2013. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Lisa Ferdinando)

The figurehead of the Coast Guard cutter Eagle is seen on a foggy Sunday morning at the Coast Guard Yard, Baltimore, Md., Nov. 17, 2013. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Lisa Ferdinando)

The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter EAGLE is seen on a foggy Sunday morning at the Coast Guard Yard in Baltimore, Maryland, November 17, 2013.

(U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Lisa Ferdinando)

(U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Lisa Ferdinando)

The Eagle, a 295-foot barque homeported in New London, Connecticut on the Thames River at the U. S. Coast Guard Academy, is a training ship used primarily for Coast Guard cadets and officer candidates.

(U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Lisa Ferdinando)

(U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Lisa Ferdinando)

Built in Germany in 1936 and recommissioned by the United States at the close of World War II, the EAGLE is the largest tall ship and the only active commissioned steel hulled sailing vessel in the U.S. military.

(U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Lisa Ferdinando)

(U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Lisa Ferdinando)

Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Thomas McKenzie.

Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Thomas McKenzie.

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  • adam barbeck

    shopsmithyahoo.com

  • adam barbeck

    what is the big square tower where a mast should be???

  • adam barbeck

    two may be listening but none are responding???

  • adam barbeck

    sorry maybe you are in the head???

  • waynep71222

    there is a not so famous story outside the USCG about the day they served split soup on the eagle during some rough weather that was keeping some of the fresh USCG cadets on deck near the rails.  some of the enlisted personnel got a liquid proof bag and stopped by the galley for some of the split pea soup.  the enlisted pretended to be depositing their dinner into the bag. this turned the green cadets even a deeper shade.. at one point as the cadets were about to blow. an enlisted person grabbed the bag.. said he was still hungry and poured the contents into his mouth.. it was fresh out of the galley.. but the cadets did not know any better. the fed the fish the for much of the trip after seeing that. 

    i hope i don’t get anybody in trouble with this..  perhaps they have retired already.  its been a LOT of years.

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