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Image credit: The Parbuckling Project

Salvors with the Titan-Micoperi consortium on Tuesday announced the completion of another important step towards the parbuckling -or uprighting- of the Costa Concordia shipwreck in Giglio: the process of positioning and installment of the two blister tanks on the wreck’s bow.

The blister tanks are special sponsons, or caissons, that will provide buoyancy to the bow from the parbuckling operation to the eventual refloating.

SEE ALSO: Costa Concordia Salvage Plan

The operation to install the blister tanks was carried out using the dynamically positioned heavy lift ship Svenja, which is owned and operated by SAL Heavy Lift and has been on scene for much of the salvage.

The operation was carried out by the MICOPERI 30 with support from the SAL LONE.

The steel tanks, with a net buoyancy of 4,000 tons, are fixed to the Costa Concordia’s hull by three anchor pipes installed in the ship’s thruster tunnels. The whole structure (including two blister tanks, the tubular frame and the three anchor pipes) weighs about 1,700 tons and measures 23 meters long by 20 meters high and have a breadth of about 15 meters.

The tanks were built at Fincantieri shipyards in Palermo and Ancona and assembled in Palermo.

The first sponsons were installed on the Costa Concordia in April. In total, 15 of the watertight chambers will be installed on the port side to provide leverage during the parbuckling, and then emptied to provide for flotation. An additional two are then expected to be installed once the ship is upright.

As gCaptain reported, the parbuckling, easily the most anticipated and important part of the salvage, is expected to be carried out in the beginning of September. The operation is expected to take several days.

Image credit: The Parbuckling Project

Image credit: The Parbuckling Project

FULL COVERAGE: Costa Concordia Salvage

Image credit: The Parbuckling Project

Image credit: The Parbuckling Project

Image credit: The Parbuckling Project

Image credit: The Parbuckling Project

The first two sponsons were installed to the port side of the Costa Concordia shipwreck in April. Image credit: Isola de Giglio Facebook

The first two sponsons were installed to the port side of the Costa Concordia shipwreck in April. Image credit: Isola de Giglio Facebook

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  • Bilge Plate

    It was actually the SAL LONE which assisted, and its role in this operation was the lift from the transport barge to the water (still quite a task). The MICOPERI vessel M30 provided the crane support, control lines, etc. during the actual installation onto the wreck. Without a doubt this was the most complicated operation anyone on this project has ever been a part of.

  • HUGH JANUS

    Not being a marine engineer myself, but a realist, I firmly believe this operation is doomed for failure. The cost, to date, has been more than twice what it originally cost to build this ship. I sure wish I had some stock in the salvage companies. In retrospect, they should have just started cutting this thing up from day one.

  • David M.Taylor

    Magnificent effort for all concerned, and our hopes and prayers are with them all. I believe they’re going to do it !
    [Been talking to the Ultimate Engineer and the Ever-Living-One about them and their safety.}

  • Ron

    To all it may concern,

    From photographs and drawings my concern is that the cassions which will tower above the the normal water line of the liner if filled with water will not only have a massive crushing effect on a hull that was never designed to be laid over onto a very uneven and solid rock sea bed or designed to take that massive amount of weight on it’s side. But in my view it will be holding the hull down instead of helping to lift it as hoped the hull has already lost some of it’s strenth.

    Speaking as a lifetime engineer now retired and with the information that I have about the Concordia the current plan defies all logic.

    I take this oppertunity in wishing all concerned the very best!for a positive end result.

    Kind Regards,

    Ron.

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