Maritime Monday 258

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week ending April 23, 2011 – Clara Bow: True to the Navy (1930) on IMDb

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Shore leave with Harold Lloyd via coldisthesea

Neil Young’s Schooner in Yachting Magazine

evsboats:

imageIn Seattle we have known for some time that Neil Young’s 101′ Baltic topsail schooner W.N. Ragland was for sale. She is moored out on Bainbridge Island in the Sound, awaiting her next assignment. I enjoyed this profile of her in the latest issue of Yachting, in which her unique aesthetic is described, aptly, as “Haight-Ashbury-hippie-pad-meets-Swiss-Family-Robinson-treehouse.”

Although, I am actually more interested in Young’s other classic, Meteor, which is now up in Port Townsend. Meteor was designed and built in Seattle by Jensen Boat Co in 1938. It is a kind of a wild boat, very streamlined and styled like something out of Metropolis. The boat is often described as having been “ahead of her time,” but thats not actually true in most ways. Lots of runabouts were designed with that streamlined, double-ended look in the 20s and 30s, probably inspired by Gold Cup speed boats of the 1920s like Baby Bootlegger. The credit for that style really goes to George Crouch, who designed Bootlegger and similar boats. Unfortunately, I don’t think Jensen really looked at Bootlegger’s lines; if they did they would have realized that the point in the stern was actually just to carry the rudder post aft of the planing surface, and that there was a step that the stern rode on. Meteor was originally designed with a double-ended planing surface, which didn’t exactly work out. Those “wings” were added to correct the design defect.

Still, it is a stylish boat, and I like that. So is Ragland, and I especially appreciate yachtsmen with such diverse tastes. Way to go, Neil.

*Neil Young at the helm photo by Philippe Tarbouriech, via Lance on Deck

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L: Miss Mertens, The Vienna Beauty via sailorjunkers – R: Vintage Poster: Rhum St. Georges via mudwerks

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via coldisthesea

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Cover art for German language version of Moby Dick; Btb Bei Goldmann pub., 2003 (via moewie)

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Martin Côté illustrations

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L: The Weather via  mudwerks Rt: The Sun Makes Us Brown; Wills’s Cigarette Trading Cards via sailorjunkers

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jraffunderwater: Coral crab (Trapezia tigrina), Guam (via artour_a)

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Dutch pulp magazine about Jules Verne, c. 1910 – posted to Flickr by Hillebrand Komrij

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The Great Elephant created by La Compagnie Royal de Luxe to celebrate Jules Verne in 2005 with parades in Nantes and Amiens. The Elephant is now in Nantes http://www.lesmachines-nantes.fr/ and takes visitors for a ride.  via dirtyriver

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ca. 1858-61; “A Cargo of Seventy Elephants Landing from Burmah during the 1857 Mutiny.” from The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Lord and Lady Canning Family Album via tuesday-johnson

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The Cat Boat 1922 – Edward Hopper (via briganda-omalley)

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(click to see full size) Sean CHEETHAM; Portrait of Chantal Menard
See also:
http://www.chantalmenard.com/

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L: Prince Namor the Submariner; via larboardwatch
RT: “Taking the Waters” Vintage Spa Poster via msbehavoyeur

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Street of French Canadian village where the position of the houses conforms to the points of the compass, rather than to the street line. (via climbing-down-bokor)

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Biggest Box Boat Afloat… for now.  via deepwaterwriter

“Cargo is King” was something I remember my dad saying when I was young. At the time I had no idea what it meant as he related tales from his latest trip as Chief Mate on a product or chemical tanker to his buddies. As I grew older and decided a maritime college was the best way to liberate myself from the drudgery of a nine to five (And the financial indebtedness a bachelors degree incurs) the thought of spending a career moving one commodity or another across the ocean was not at the top of my list o’ reasons for joining the merchant marine…

keep reading

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Akihiko Hirata salutes Eiji Tsuburaya during shooting of Storm Over the Pacific (ハワイ・ミッドウェイ大海空戦 太平洋の嵐, Hawai Middouei daikaikusen: Taiheiyo no arashi) (literally, Hawaii-Midway Battle of the Sea and Sky: Storm in the Pacific Ocean) 1960 (via coldisthesea)

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photo by dani dimonvia tentaclegarden

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USS St. Lo (CVE-63) via fuckyeahwrecks

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Octopus Chandelier by Adam Wallacavage – http://www.adamwallacavage.com/

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Artist: Rachel Wilson via octopoda

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Rio Negro, Brazil – Photograph by George Steinmetz  via nationalgeographicdaily

Water dark with tannin inspired the name Rio Negro, or “black river,” which swirls across virgin sand in Lenciois Maranhenses National Park.  In the park’s ponds, thriving communities of algae can turn the water blue or green.

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USS Flusser; ship’s cat Wockle on the capstan in Venice, Italy, 1924-25; Cats in the Sea Services | U.S. Naval Institute (via mudwerks)

USS Flusser (DD-289) – The third USS Flusser was a Clemson-class destroyer in the United States Navy following World War I. Launched 7 November 1919 by Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Squantum, Massachusetts.

Active service was patrol duty in Mexican waters between 9 May 1920 and 17 June, based at Key West. She carried out a comprehensive training schedule along the east coast and in the Caribbean until 18 June 1924 when she sailed from Newport, Rhode Island for a tour of duty with U.S. Naval Forces, Europe, calling at ports in 15 countries before returning to New York 16 July 1925.

Returning to east coast and Caribbean operations, Flusser aided in the development of destroyer tactics and carried reservists on training cruises until decommissioned at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1 May 1930. She was scrapped 22 October 1930 in accordance with the terms of the London Treaty limiting naval armaments.  See photo of USS Flusser (DD-289)

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(via allmermaids)

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Demons Keuka Hagihara (Kyouka Hagihara)via allmermaids

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Easter Eggs for Hitler – via thewidowflannigan

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Mercury via tentaclegarden

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photo by Mike Pechyonkin via flotsam-jetsam-ebb-and-flow – see more: Red Sea Marine Life Group

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L: Romantic Story #92 One Kiss Before Dying (via dirtyriver) – R: Katy Keene; Archie Comics, also from dirtyriver

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The Seagull and the Cat Who Showed It How to Fly by Luis Sepulveda. Lina DÅ«daitÄ— was put on IBBY’s 2010 List of Honour for her illustrations to the book – (more on animalarium)

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James Jacques-Joseph Tissot, Room Overlooking the Harbor, 1876-78  full size on theshipthatflew

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Mobbing the great sea lantern; Illustration by Charles Whymper, from Birds of the wave and woodland, by Phil Robinson, London, 1894; (via oldbookillustrations)

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Inner Glow Jellyfish in Ningaloo Reef, Australia by Ross Gudgeon – (via sea-stuff)

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Underwater Photography by Will Tee Yang

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At world’s End II; Casein on linen by Paul Harbutt, 2007: via slangking (see full size)

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via coldisthesea

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L: TheHarderTheyFall by leon ryan –  R: BUNNY by JTO

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Alfred Hitchcock (via mudwerks)

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Winslow Homer‘s “Undertow,” 1886 – oil on canvas, 30 x 48”
from:
Winslow Homer’s Tumultuous Seas and Passive Women

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Happy Easter from Monkey Fist
See you next week!