Maritime Monday 259: The Cerulean Fishing Blues

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imageCerulean, also spelled caerulean, may be applied to a range of colors from bright blue or azure color through greenish blue colors.

The first recorded use of cerulean as a color name in English was in 1590. The word is probably derived from the Latin word caeruleus, “dark blue, blue or blue-green”, which in turn probably derives from caelulum, diminutive of caelum, “heaven, sky”.

In classical times, cerulean was used to describe blue pigments, particularly mixtures of copper and cobaltous oxides. These early attempts to create sky blue colors were often less than satisfactory due to greenish hues and lack of permanence. When the pigment cerulean blue was invented, it largely superseded all these prior pigments.

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Dog & dorries aboard fishing schooner — Leslie Jones, 1886-1967 (photographer) Glass negative; Boston Public Library, Print Department; Original (1176 x 1500)

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coldisthesea has found a collection of ship’s patches that are def worth checking out.
See them on his tumbler blog

 

Sharks, The News Cycle, and The Madness of Mobs

…48 hours after the latest shark attack became news, in Puerto Juarez [a small port just north of the Cancun Hotel zone], fishermen received an encouraging “go ahead” to basically go out and kill sharks…  In only a few hours, a small fleet of fishermen from Cancun went up and down the coast and in this one outing it turned into a mass slaughter of sharks. By night, 19 hours later, in secrecy, in the Juarez port, they laid out 70 shark corpses, some of them females who were pregnant. The sharks had an average size of 2 meters, although some bigger ones were about 3 meters…

See the article on Deep Sea News »
(heads’ up: pics of dead sharks)

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… In 1920, Sheeler collaborated with the photographer Paul Strand on the short film Manhatta, a short expressive film about New York City based on portions of Whitman’s Leaves of Grass. The six-minute film spans an imaginary day in the life of New York City, beginning with footage of Staten Island ferry commuters and culminating with the sun setting over the Hudson River. It has been described as the first avant-garde film made in America…

Charles Sheeler, River Rouge Plant, 1932 – see more

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Callorhynque (Callorhynchus antarticus) + Squale (Squalus centrina) – See More on Bibliodyssey

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Dutch business magazine with nice cover by Hans Borrebach issued May, 1942. Text in Dutch indicates trouble doing business and sinking into the vortex – posted by twincovercollector

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Duelling Fencers in April 1904 (via drtuesdaygjohnson)

I remember being astonished and in my mid-20s when I found out my father knew how to fence.

He told me that the day-in, day-out of life aboard the ole’ minesweeper got to be a little, ok, a lot boring.  He made a vow to himself in the early days aboard ship that he would find one thing that someone knew how to do that he didn’t, and enlist them to teach him, for every crew member and officer aboard ship.  It gave him something to look forward to every day, and well… travel does broaden one.

Apparently, someone aboard the USS Hamilton (DD-141) knew how to fence.

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‘atlantis2′ – by Jon Carling 2011. more »

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From Hell’s Heart by Tyler Jacobson (more) via coldisthesea

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Ahab Hunts the Whale  by Tyler Jacobson (see full size) also via coldisthesea

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Pirate Ship Tree House, Horseheads, New York; photo by John Carberry (via Beauty in Everything – Photography) on The Scuttlefish (the tumblr)

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Star of the Deep (just-adropintheocean) via tentaclegarden – Photograph courtesy David Shale

A rare basket star, seen riding on its intricate network of arms, is among a haul of strange and previously unknown deep-sea creatures recently found in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean, scientists announced Tuesday.

Ten potentially new species—including “mountaineering” sea cucumbers and possible “missing links” between invertebrates and backboned animals—were discovered during the six-week expedition.  more

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Coelacanth; Latimeria menadoensis – Location: Tokyo Sea Life Park (Kasai Rinkai Suizokuen), Japan

Full resolution‎ (2,601 × 2,601 pixels)

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oldbookillustrations: The Sun And The Frogs, by JJ. Grandville. From Fables de La Fontaine book 12, by Jean de La Fontaine, Paris, 1855. Via archive.org

It’s peeper season here by the lake in Maine.  Every muck hole and soggy ditch seems to be hosting hordes of the things.  By 5 pm, the screeching is so loud it sounds like the Mother Ship is hovering.  It’s kinda cloudy, warm and dismal here today, so the celebrations have started early.

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Sea Devils – Issue No. 35, June 1967 — Cover art by Howard Purcell and Carmine Infantino. See full size on PopKulture

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“No lords spiritual or temporal in New England.” – New Englanders stave off an immigrant bishop, waving liberty poles and copies of Locke.  see full size on coldisthesea

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Monster Soup commonly called Thames Water on 2headedsnake

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Hastings Humour vintage postcard – artist: Donald McGill

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Doctor SCUBA

Four years before Jacques Cousteau introduced his self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA), Dr. Christian Lambertsen developed the Lambertsen Amphibious Respirator Unit (LARU, above) to replace the heavy, tethered, underwater explorer suits popular at the time.

Although the Navy rejected the LARU, once WWII broke out the Office of Strategic Services (OSS, predecessor to the CIA) recognized its strategic value and had it tested. What made the LARU unique, beyond its mobility was the carbon dioxide filter that made the LARU bubble-free, perfect for clandestine amphibious assaults. It was used successfully in Burma, and after the war Lambertsen was asked to train Navy SEALs (not called that yet) in underwater assault techniques.

Oh, and he was a licensed physician. He served on the medical faculty at UPenn beginning in 1946.

(Image courtesy of sta.rtup.biz)

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L: Agent 0008 Book Cover ‘The Sex Ray’ via hoodoothatvoodoo
RT:
creature from the black lagoon 1954 (via dirtyriver)

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Jiri Trnka (Czech), illustration for Andersen’s Fairy Tales, 1959.
See more Trnka illustrations here. (via 50watts)

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Ocean Meets Sky by igo2cairo(see set) – via thedaintysquid

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Erich Angenendt; Historische Ansicht mit Bierfässern | Historical view with beer barrels (via mudwerks)

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On the Yacht “Namouna,” VeniceJulius LeBlanc Stewart. 1890 – Get Thee to a Nunnery

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Yachting in the Mediterranean – Julius LeBlanc Stewart. 1896 – see full size

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Christmas Day In The Navy This delightful photo of an old seadog catching a few winks, appeared in the 17 November, 1937 issue of The Sphere. A caption read, “A siesta study after special rations”.

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1924 is the last time nautical-styled clothing appears in the Sears catalogs for several years. (via briganda-omalley) see also

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Shell & dog, Boston fort – Leslie Jones, 1886-1967 (photographer)

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La Isla de los Muertos – this and many more on drakecaperton

Ship Envy on DeepWaterWriting:

imageEver since my first experience at sea I have listened to mariners lament how the number of ships sailing under a U.S. flag has dwindled for decades.

In a world where there are now over 100,000 merchant vessels the United States Merchant Marine accounts for only 1.4% of the total gross tonnage; a number that has only fallen year after year from a high of 36% in World War Two.

Of course WWII was an exceptional time when our sealift capacity ensured the allied nations of Europe were fed, fueled and armed but for the wealthiest nation on earth to reside so low on the list is concerning for seafaring Americans such as myself…

keep reading »

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Atlantic City, New Jersey, circa 1910. “Hotel St. Charles.” see full size on Shorpy — (via presentsfromthepast)

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A Sailor’s Sweetheart by bpdansen on Etsyvia kari-young

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L: St. Martin’s Press, Dedicated to Kilroy and the 14,216,097 dogfaces, swabbies, leathernecks, airhogs, crate pushers, and seabees who fought beside him

Yes, that Andy Rooney, but this is before he went batshit insane and became a kind of geriatric Colonel Kurtz, inhabiting the end of 60 minutes like the end of the river and haranguing the world to get off his existential lawn.  (via thegildedcentury)

RT: (see full size on thegildedcentury) “The left one’s named Anastasia, the right one’s Moe.  They’re married, but they’re not really talking to one another.  Y’see, Moe agreed to have the baby baptized inta the Eastern Orthodox church like Anastasia wanted, but now she says she wants him ta convert, since that’s how they’re raisin’ the kid.  Moe is sayin’ he wants to stay Anglican, but the real reason is he suspects he’s become an agnostic, and he would feel like a hypocrite gettin’ converted.  Meanwhile Anastasia’s been spending more and more time with my left glove, who’s named Philippe…  What I’m sayin’ is, I’m gonna need those back in time for tonight’s episode.”

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La “Jeanne d’Arc” – Watercolor of my ancient vessel of French Navy helicopters’s carrier “Jeanne d’Arc” boat school of midships, also carried me over oceans and seas of the world for 2 rounds of the globe……Thanks to her I visited many harbours and cities of the whole world – posted by Christian Couteauvia lostinmaine

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L: Ferguson Findley – Waterfront; Popular Library (1952) Cover art by Sam Cherry
RT: Miss Katherine Lewis. Victorian stage actress . Circa 1880 (via mudwerks)

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Édouard Boubat – (via firsttimeuser)

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Omar Rayyan – mermaid and monkey

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Liu Ye, “The Little Mermaid” (2004) via www.artinfo.com

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[coloring page via, manatee unidentified] – (via mudwerks)

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THE PARAGONS – The Tide Is High on 45andsingle

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Ahoy by digidali on Etsy