Maritime Monday 257; week ending April 16, 2011

Monkey Fist
Total Views: 11
April 17, 2011

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Bad at Sports; A Weekly Podcast About Contemporary Art (image)

Mediterranean Corsairs

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O’er the glad waters of the dark blue sea,
Our thoughts as boundless, and our souls as free,
Far as the breeze can bear, the billow foam,
Survey our empire and behold our home!
These are our realms, no limits to their sway-
Our flag the scepter all who meet obey.
Ours the wild life in tumult still to range
From toil to rest, and in every change.

There is a fundamental distinction between corsair-privateering and piracy. A pirate is one who professes to scour the sea and seize merchants. Unlike the pirates the corsair was nominally empowered by a sovereign state to seize merchants. Licenses and letters legalized the activities of the corsair-privateers for the duration of a particular war against specified enemies.

In the Mediterranean, corsairs sailed under a different set of rules. Mediterranean corsairs battled the war of Christianity and Islam in which all powers in the Mediterranean were involved. Christian and Islamic nations did not condone theft on the sea or plunder for the sake of goods, but they employed corsairs for crusading activities in a type of “holy war”.

The Mediterranean corsair was thus distinguished from a pirate and a regular corsair-privateer by the moral, political and religious inclinations of their fight on the sea. Not only did the activity promise earthly riches and power, but, most uniquely, the salvation of their souls.

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Perfidious Albion,  John Ward the pirate.

“John Ward or Birdy (c. 1553 – 1622), also known as Jack Ward and under his Muslim name Yusuf Reis, was a notorious English pirate around the turn of the 17th century who later became a Barbary Corsair operating out of Tunis during the early 17th century…”

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(left) Edward Penfield, artist, 1917; Edward Penfield (1866–1925) was a leading American illustrator in the era known as the “Golden Age of American Illustration” and he is considered the father of the American Poster. His work has been included in almost every major book on American Illustration or the history of the poster. He is also a major figure in the evolution of graphic design.  more on wiki(rt) Sea-tourists, Heyst sur Mer (Belgium), ca 1910. Photographer: F. Stainier-Hannet, Anvers/Antwerp; via hoodoothatvoodoo

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Sailors acting silly via climbing-down-bokor –  See also

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Oh, Gomez…  —  Source: trixietreats

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via coldisthesea

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via fuckyeahoceancreatures

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The Daughters of Ran by Hans Dahl – via msbehavoyeur

Peek-Maestro via zbags

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maycontainawesome

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SS Michelangelo via myoctoberrevolution

SS Michelangelo was an Italian ocean liner built in 1965 for Italian Line by Ansaldo Shipyards, Genoa. She was one of the last ships to be built primarily for liner service across the North Atlantic.

…The most striking feature in the ships were their Turin polytechnic-designed funnels, which consisted of an intricate trellis-like pipework (instead of the traditional even surface) to allow wind to pass through the funnel, and a large smoke deflector fin on the top. Although much criticised, the funnel design proved to be highly effective in keeping smoke off the rear decks. The smoke deflectors became popular in ship design during the 1970s and 1980s, whereas the idea of allowing wind to pass though the funnel was picked up again in the late 1980s and is almost the norm in modern shipbuilding.

The Michelangelo’s interiors were designed by naval architects Nino Zoncada, Vincenzo Monaco and Amedeo Luccichenti, who gave the ship a less adventurous, more traditional look than the designers of her sister Raffaello…

MORE

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The coconut crab, Birgus latro, is the largest land-living arthropod in the world, and is probably at the upper size limit of terrestrial animals with exoskeletons in today’s atmosphere. It is also known as the robber crab or palm thief, because some coconut crabs are rumored to steal shiny items such as pots and silverware from houses and tents.  More: Coconut crab

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eatsleepdraw: (photoshop cs3) – I’m looking to start doing prints and gig posters so if there are any unknown bands out there looking for an artist let me know! :) http://exogenesis-overture.tumblr.com/

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A Bang Phat fisherman heads home after a day on the water

Shrimping in Thailand by Nancy Griffin

For several years now, shrimp has been the biggest-selling seafood in the U.S. In Maine, we love shrimp and happily buy our tiny Pandalus borealis from trucks by the side of the road in season, from harvesters and coops, or in the supermarket, fresh or frozen.

But the bulk of the shrimp sold elsewhere in the U.S. and even in New England, is not the tiny, northern wild-caught Pandalus borealis, but bigger shrimp, similar to those harvested by southern shrimpers in the Gulf of Mexico. However, most of the shrimp sold nationwide—more than 80 percent—are not wild-caught at all, but farmed in several Asian and South American countries.

Americans have consumed 4.1 pounds of shrimp per capita for the past several years, with “one of the highest consumption rates in the world,” said Eric Schwaab, NOAA assistant administrator for NOAA’s Fisheries Service…

keep reading

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L:Paul Cadmus (artist) (via mudwerks) — RT – This illustration is from the good old days when dark beards were synonymous with foreignness and Bolshevism.  —“Peter’s fist crashed to the man’s bearded jaw…”

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The Nereid Doto by Inka Essenhigh 2009 (after Thomas Sully, 1836) — (via oneblackline)

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‘return’ – Jon Carling 2011 – http://www.joncarling.etsy.com/

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L: A Newhaven Pilot; Hill & Adamson. 1916 carbon print from original c.1845 negative —  RT: 1931 Fortune Magazine (via mudwerks)

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Andreas FeiningerBowery Tattoo Parlor, Circa 1940s — (via presentsfromthepast)

“Darkened by the gridwork of the Third Avenue elevated, the Bowery was a shadowy boulevard of netherworld appeals. Tattoo parlors dotted the avenue, the signs and display windows assuring potential customers what they could expect. With its shady reputation and inexpensive services, the Bowery was the Fifth Avenue of day laborers, itinerant seamen, drifters and drunks — men who could get a black eye repainted to look natural for as little as a dime.”  —From New York in the Forties

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The Wilhelm Gustloff‘s final voyage was during Operation Hannibal in January 1945, when it was sunk while participating in the evacuation of civilians and personnel who were surrounded by the Red Army in East Prussia. The Gustloff was hit by three torpedoes from the Soviet submarine S-13 in the Baltic Sea on the night of 30 January 1945 and sank in less than 45 minutes. An estimated 9,400 people were killed in the sinking.[1][2] If accurate, this would be the largest known loss of life occurring during a single ship sinking in recorded maritime history. –(via fuckyeahwrecks)

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L: silent screen goddess Alice White via thewidowflannigan

RT: I just got this tattoo done a few hours ago. It’s a nutmeg plant, located on my back, flanked by my portrait of Ulysses S. Grant. It’s for my home state, Connecticut, nicknamed “the Nutmeg State”. According to legend, 18th and 19th century Connecticut peddlers carved wood to imitate the exotic nut and sold them at exorbitant prices to unsuspecting buyers, and thus, our notoriously devious reputation stuck. However, some believe it was the ignorance of the spice and it’s preparation that lead to confusion. Some assumed the nut was to be cracked to reveal meat rather than simply ground to attain the powder. –drtuesdaygjohnson

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Underwater Photography by CW Ye

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A married diplomat falls hopelessly under the spell of a predatory woman.  A Fool There Was, 1915.  Dir. Frank Powell; starring Theda Bara.  Based on a poem by Rudyard Kipling. — (via mudwerks)

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coldisthesea; DE 644, USS Vammen. Featured in the 1959 Jerry Lewis movie “Dont Give Up the Ship” (imdb) as the USS “Marilyn” Kornblatt. “Marilyn” because she bulged in all the right places…

See USS Vammen today…

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blueguitar (via sailorjunkers)

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Hull Trawler – cabin scene(via whatsthatpicture)

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L: vintage advertisement for fishing gear; Trawlers and Ballers magazine 1958 via thegirlcantdanceRT: Art deco Illustrations

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Bernard Buffet, “Le hublot géant du Nautilus”via tanuchi

Bernard Buffet (10 July 1928 – 4 October 1999) was a French painter of Expressionism and Member of the Anti-Abstract Art Group “L’homme Témoin [the Witness-Man]”  MORE ON WIKI

MORE: http://museebernardbuffet.com/english.html

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dirtyriver: Damn the proton torpedoes, full speed ahead!

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Plucked from the dirtyriver; Art by Darwyn Cooke via grantbridgestreet : Darwyn Cooke is an Eisner Award-winning comic book writer, artist, cartoonist and animator, best known for his work on the comic books Catwoman, DC: The New Frontier, The Spirit and Richard Stark’s Parker: The Hunter.  MORE

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Ivan Yakovlevich Bilibin; The “Volga” Epic, 1928 – via darksilenceinsuburbia

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L: (via tentaclegarden) RT: (via Pulp International – Pin up page from the Italian newspaper supplement Travasissimo circa 1948)

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Diagrams of the Unicorn from the book The Making of Tintin by Leslie Lonsdale-Cooper via dirtyriver

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via allmermaids

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Nautical Tradition: Whenever someone yells, “NIPPLE TRAIN!”
Well, you can see for yourself.  via climbing-down-bokor

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Turtle by ~lwarecki on deviantART ~ artist profile: Laura Warecki (via sealust)

The Marvelous Misadventures of Flapjack

via coldisthesea

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You Only Live Twice by Robert McGinnis – via whatmakesthepieshopstick

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