Maritime Monday; Feb 13, 2011

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Potsdam Ship Model School – Fascinatingly realistic, these model vessels were built on a scale of 1 to 20. At the left is a Lilliputian version of Germany’s 10,000-ton pocket battleship the Deutschland. One of a series of historic photographs from a National Geographic article in the February 1937 issue titled “Changing Berlin”. It offers a fascinating look at Berlin, Germany, a few years before the start of World War II.

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Standard Fruit and Steamship Company (Vaccaro Line) USA; Sailings 1936

(above) The Morazan (2,984 grt, 300 ft. long) was built in 1908 as the Manco of the Booth Line. She was bought by Vaccaro Brothers in 1922 and sailed for Standard Fruit on the Mexican run until sold in 1941. She was eventually seized by the Japanese and sunk in 1944 by a U.S. submarine.

Ports of Call: New Orleans, Vera Cruz Aboard: Morazan, Tegucigalpa

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Popular Science; April 1940Mechanix Illustrated Sabotage! (Oct, 1954)

A. Aubrey Bodine – Aerial Escort, 1950 – Gelatin silver print (via yama-bato)

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Monkey’s new desktop BG:  Sandstar and Lucky by worstwater Original (2592 x 1728)

Deep Water Writer – The Silence of Snow

After 78 days at sea just standing in the woods on the side of a mountain after a proper blizzard was almost as much of a thrill as snowboarding in the best conditions of the year. The sensation of freedom dry land and free time provides a sailor kept me pumped throughout the day as we made run after run on my favorite mountain in New England.

It’s days like this that provide my greatest justification for spending at least half of my life away from the world and they become an important source of energy and confidence when I’m exhausted and fed up with life at work. My last hitch was no exception.

All in all it was a great trip. We had one of the best crews I have ever worked with. The steward department put out some of the most edible food I’ve had at work or at home. The Boatswain managed the deck gang as all Boatswains should; handling beefs before the mast whenever he could and giving the guys breaks when they needed them while completing my ceaseless to do lists. The cargo was delivered in the condition in which it was loaded and there were no major accidents or injuries. Despite all of our small victories, for one reason or another, this last trip had a draining effect on my energy level and interest in remaining at sea indefinitely for the rest of my life.

keep reading on Deep Water Writing

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LEFT: A lofting of the 1906 George Kneass Whitehall skiff on the floor at the Northwest School of Wooden Boat Building in Port Hadlock, WA. – RT: Canvas maker’s mark on a sail from the Wawona.

Nantucket Whaler Lost in Pacific Tells Its Tale at Last – NYTimes.com

On Friday, in a discovery that might bring a measure of peace to Captain Pollard, who survived his second wreck (though his career did not), researchers announced that they have found the remains of the Two Brothers. The whaler went down exactly 188 years ago after hitting a reef at the French Frigate Shoals, a treacherous atoll about 600 miles northwest of here. The trove includes dozens of artifacts: harpoon tips, whaling lances and three intact anchors.

The discovery is believed to be the first of a Nantucket whaler, one of an armada of ships that set sail during the early 19th century when the small Massachusetts island was an international capital of whaling. It was a risky pursuit that led sailors halfway across the world — and sometimes to the bottom of the sea.

“Very little material has been recovered from whale ships that foundered because they generally went down far from shore and in the deepest oceans,” said Ben Simons, chief curator of the Nantucket Historical Association. “We have a lot of logbooks and journals that record disasters at sea, but to be taken to the actual scene of the sunken vessel — that’s really what is so amazing about this.”

keep reading »

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whatsthatpicture: heavy seas; aboard SS New Zealand – Arrival of the harbor pilot; SS New Zealand

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Sailors Wanted: See the World, Spread Disease! – Simon Norfolk, Bonetta Cemetery at Comfortless Cove.

“For most of the island’s history, Comfortless Cove was used as a quarantine when ships arrived that were carrying sick sailors, often with typhoid or Yellow Fever. Across the lava flow is the American controlled Pyramid Point radar station, known as “the golf ball” (via mpdrolet)

Ascension Island (wiki) Ascension Island is an isolated volcanic island in the equatorial waters of the South Atlantic Ocean, around 1,600 kilometres (994 mi) from the coast of Africa, and 2,250 kilometres (1,398 mi) from the coast of South America which is roughly midway between the horn of South America and Africa.  The location of the island made it a useful stopping point for ships and communications. The Royal Navy used the island as a victualling station for ships, particularly those of the West Africa Squadron working against the slave trade.

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Left: Children and the sea Serpent, summer 1937, Nantucket via mpdrolet
RT: Great Moments in Navigation History: dark days before gps via marriedtothesea.com

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Icebound Whaling Ship; about 1875 by William Bradford – Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

WIKI: William Bradford (painter) first visited the Arctic in the mid-1850s and made at least ten trips there over the next decade. He documented his experiences in paintings and in photographs published in “The Arctic Regions,” an 1873 album.

Here, a whaling vessel is silhouetted against a glistening iceberg. The animation of the sky, the view into the far distance, and the carefully calibrated palette that evokes the eerie color of Arctic light make this one of Bradford’s most accomplished paintings.

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Victorian / Edwardian Paintings: The Discovery prison hulk at Deptford

The forbidding form of the beached convict ship HMS Discovery at Deptford. Launched as a 10-gun sloop at Rotherhithe in 1789, the ship served as a convict hulk from 1818 until scrapped in February 1834. (via mudwerks)

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WWII caricature of Churchill and Roosevelt fighting over Africa by artist Jean Fort and published in 1941 by Bedos & Co of Paris at the behest of ORAFF*, the German propaganda unit in occupied France.

Prints & Engravings section; département of Loire-Atlantique; See the BibliOdyssey post (more)

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LEFT: Lieutenant Robert Alexander, Commander of H.M. Submarine Pandora with his vessel in the U.S. Navy Yard at Portsmouth, New Hampshire; 25 October, 1941 RT: Pipers of the Black Watch aboard a Royal Navy ship in the Mediterranean; 30 November, 1940

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image“Adria” S.A. di Navigazione Marittima / Italy

Pleasure-trips in the Mediterranean
Regular Weekly Service 1931

Ports of Call: Fiume, Ancona, Bari, Catania, Malta, Messina, Palermo, Naples, Leghorn, Genoa, Imperia, Marseilles, Barcelona, Valencia.

This company was based at Fiume, Italy (now Rijeka in Croatia) Formed as “Adria” Royal Hungarian Sea Navigation Co. in the Croatian part of Hungary in the 1880s. Adria was merged into Tirrenia in the late 1930s

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Way Wicked Water Wenches: Powerful illustrations by Pedro Henrique Ferreira (via mudwerks)

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Kobayashi Kiyochika – Chinese Black Ship, Japanese White Ship (Shina kurofune Nihon hakusen), from the series Comical Art Exhibit of the Sino-Japanese War; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

*at press time, the Museum of Fine Arts Boston web site was down; click here to see image full size

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After a year and a half of non-stop traveling with Human Planet, it appears that for me this particular journey is now over.

It’s been an amazing experience and one that has brought me into contact with our incredibly diverse species across almost every inhabitable environment on the planet.  I’m sure you won’t be too surprised to learn that I can report back that human beings are the same the world over…

Keep reading on Scuttlefish »

See also: Friday Happy Hour: Nautical Beer Stein

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Jack Tars Ahoy!! via Bluejacket Coast Guard security watch at Higgins shipyard, New Orleans via SemperParatus.com

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Sponge Diver at Tarpon Springs, Florida – Displays Seven Varieties of Sponge, From Left: “Wool” – “Yellow” – “Wire” – “Grass” – Glove” – “Finger” – and “Coral” – via What Makes The Pie Shops Tick?

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Sunny’s BarProject Neon! Flickr Set Otto’s Shrunken Head

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Tin can used as a flotation device in learn-to-swim class, Domain Baths, c.1930 –NSW Archives

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Catalina Island Souvenir Folder – “The Magic Isle” – back cover of a folder that contained 18 postcards of Catalina Island, postmarked Sep 3, 1938   SEE ALL

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Watched a show this week about Doolittle’s Raiders; A B-25 taking off from Hornet for the raid

The Doolittle Raid, on 18 April 1942, was the first air raid by the United States to strike the Japanese Home Islands (Honshu) during World War II. By demonstrating that Japan itself was vulnerable to American air attack, it provided a vital morale boost and opportunity for U.S. retaliation after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941. The raid was planned and led by Lieutenant Colonel James “Jimmy” Doolittle. Doolittle would later recount in his autobiography that the raid was intended to bolster American morale and to cause the Japanese to begin doubting their leadership…

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Landsturm unteroffizier, 4 Battalion, II Bavarian ArmeekorpsExplodierte französische Granate
Postcards from the Great War (Set: 3,087)

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graphite drawings by ethan murrow (via themurkydepths)

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Modeling beachwear, 1950s; via theniftyfifties

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(Source: iamtheoceanandiamthesea)

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You’re MOTOR me than I can say, Valentine. circa 1930s