Maritime Monday 250; Feb 6, 2011

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Frigate USS Merrimack (1856-1861)

Line engraving published in “Harper’s Weekly”, 1861, as part of the larger print seen in Photo # NH 59236. It depicts USS Merrimack (incorrectly spelled “Merrimac”) under repair at the Norfolk Navy Yard, circa early 1861.

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The HORROR of the HORRIBLE Giant GHOST CAT on VINTAGE SLEAZE the BLOG

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30 Seconds Over Tokyo via greatestgeneration

Pilots aboard a U.S. Navy aircraft carrier – Listening to last minute instructions before launching an attack

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(via allmermaids)

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“On Board HMS Bellerophon” by William Quiller-Orchardson

The HMS Bellerophon was a third-rate Ship of the Line which fought in many famous battles including the Glorious First of June, the Battle of the Nile and the Battle of Trafalgar. She gained further fame by carrying Napoleon Bonaparte to England after he surrendered to Captain Frederick Maitland.

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An Amalgam of Medical and Maritime History – interesting maritime links from the last month

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Sail Forever by Vaïnui de Castelbajac –  Cover Art for The Hard and the Easy by Great Big Sea
(via thingsihappentolike)
a nautical art blog

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Yitzhak “Ike” Aronowicz (1923-2009) was the captain of the immigrant ship SS Exodus, which unsuccessfully tried to dock in British-occupied Palestine with Holocaust survivors on July 11, 1947, after the end of World War II. His surname was later spelled as Ahronovitch.

Born in Danzig (now Gdansk, Poland), he came to the land later known as Israel at the age of 10. Aged 23, he was the captain of the SS Exodus, on its trip from the port of Sète, France, a fishing town on July 11, 1947 carrying 4,515 passengers which was intercepted by a fleet of British war ships led by the British Royal Navy cruiser Ajax and a convoy of destroyers trailed the ship from very early in its voyage. Two British destroyers rammed the ship.

After several hours of hand-to-hand combat between passengers armed with smoke bombs trying to prevent British sailors from boarding the ship, the British opened fire. Two immigrants and a crewman were killed, and many passengers seriously wounded. The ship was towed to Haifa, where it was abandoned. The passengers were deported first to France, and then to Lübeck, Germany. In 1953 the SS Exodus was burned to the waterline, and in 1963 its remains were finally dismantled.

Aronowicz was a highly experienced naval officer who trained in the officers course in London for third through first officer. He died in Israel on December 23, 2009, ate the age of 86. He was survived by two daughters, seven grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren. See also:

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Women firefighters after the attack on Pearl Harbor, from Life magazine series Women in the Fight

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via iamtheoceanandiamthesea

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Cabot’s Voyage 1497 Polar Exploration Cigarette Card. John Player and Sons, 1915  FULL SET

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The Mississippi River System as transit map (via fuckyeahcartography)

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Last night, thick fog closed in, the horn called out into the silent, empty night…

But over the radio, many voices spoke. As the winds came, the fog was cleared away, but the tension mounted as the wind grew in strength, gusting over 40kts. When the winds howl, you hear the tightness in their voices.

Coming in this morning, from being in the Panama Canal four days ago, was this ship, calling from the 26 buoy at around 04h30, navigating its way around traffic, an anchoring tug and barge and into Red Hook. The winds began to die down, and everyone was talking…   MORE »

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The Sailor’s Duffle Coat

The Duffle Coat is a perfect sartorial example of form following function. The signature three quarter length design was popularised by those hardy souls from in Royal Navy during the first World War.

Featuring a hood, neck strap, tartan lining and most notably ‘walrus tooth’ fastenings, it was born out of necessity. The thick, coarse wool which makes up the coat was first created in the Belgian town of Duffel, although in typically English fashion a little tweak to the spelling was in order. While the woollen material came from Belgium, the first version of the duffle coat itself was conceived in the UK.

keep reading on OiPolloi

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Mermaid Pinball Backglass Image courtesy of Blue Skies Above Us(via allmermaids)

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Brooklyn Mermaidsphoto by NY harbor blogger and kayaker frogma

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whatsthatpicture? The Airgraph in WW2 – one of a unique set of 41 images

This unique batch of WW2 images appear to be an ‘official’ pictorial essay about the Airgraph, a film based system used to save weight to send hundreds of thousands of letters to and from troops overseas during WW2. Check the full set (click image) for examples of letters, the machinery used, and the people who processed them.

More information at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Airgraph, and a great (of its time) Pathe film at www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=12653

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World War II flying boats – medium format transparency – See also:

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The Imperishable by Rockwell Kent

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“A View of the Gallant Action”, Artist Unknown

The HMS Shannon was a 38-gun frigate of the Royal Navy that served in the Napoleonic Wars and the War of 1812 between Britain and the United States. In the latter conflict she won a noteworthy victory, capturing the USS Chesapeake in Boston Harbor.

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HMS Sans Pareil ready for launching, Thames Ironworks; 1887

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whatsthatpicture? – Mystery set of 8 lantern slides depicting life onboard a warship, I’m guessing c. WWI  Mystery lantern slides (1 thru 4)Mystery lantern slides (5 thru 8 )

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Embroidered Seabag, circa 1842-1862 The bag features the name J.A. Fort and a depiction of USS Congress among its decorations and symbols.  Another example on Land & Sea Collection

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Moby Dick, the Arion Press edition (via bluewaterblackheart)

Between 1978 and 1979 Andrew Hoyem undertook the ambitious production of an edition of Moby Dick for his Arion Press. All text in the book was hand-set in metal type (one character at a time) and letterpress printed on custom hand-made paper. To accompany the text throughout, 100 stunning wood engravings were cut by renowned printmaker and illustrator Barry Moser. Due to its high level of craftsmanship, the edition was limited to 265 copies, and is considered a masterpiece of modern bookmaking — named by the Grolier Club as one of the “100 Most Beautiful Books of the 20th Century”.  MORE »

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Marina Bychkova via themurkydepthsMTTS Postcard by Rachelle Fox via nauticalnancy

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Regulations for the Navy of the Confederate States 1862 (entire text online in multiple formats)

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SOME VERY COOL PLAYING CARDS designed by Felix Blommestijn –  via bluewaterblackheart

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Vintage Tattoo Flash’s photostream (1,676)

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The Wreckers; 1874 by William Holbrook Beard – Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

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Jumpin’ at the Record Shop Flickr Set

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Song of the Week:

The Pogues Greenland Whale Fisheries; Peel Sessions, April 17, 1984

WIKI: The Pogues are an Irish rock band, formed in 1982 and fronted by Shane MacGowan. The band reached international prominence in the 1980s and early 1990s. MacGowan left the band in 1991 due to drinking problems but the band continued first with Joe Strummer and then with Spider Stacy on vocals before breaking up in 1996.

The band reformed in 2001, and has been playing regularly ever since, most notably on the US East Coast around St Patrick’s Day and across the UK and Ireland every December. The group has yet to record any new music and according to Spider Stacy on Pogues.com has no inclination to do so.

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Sea Horse Restaurant
Mukiltoe, Washington
Our famous Captain’s Table Smorgasbord including a delicious variety of hot dishes
Weds 6-10 pmOrgan & piano loungeLive Music Nightly

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See You Next Week!
(via
fuckyeahoceancreatures)