Maritime Monday 244; Speed — More Speed

Monkey Fist
Total Views: 2
December 20, 2010

image

Ships For Victory
U.S. Maritime Commission

“Speed — More Speed” — Franklin D. Roosevelt
United States Maritime Administration
1942
click thumbnail to see original


imageTIME magazine’s People Who Mattered

Thad Allen
National Incident Commander for the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

Highs: The gruff Allen, a retired admiral and former commandant of the Coast Guard who helped manage the response to Hurricane Katrina, was a rare reassuring presence in the troubled federal efforts to control the Gulf oil spill. It was Allen who ran the near-daily press conferences, and who was the final authority for any decisions made by BP as it struggled to repair the ongoing leak. No one came out of the spill clean, but Allen made out better than most.

Lows: Even though the chain of command put Allen at the top, there were still times when it seemed that BP-the guilty party-was running the shop. Too often the federal response was slow to dispense information, leaving a vacuum. And at the end of the day, it still took months for Allen’s team to finally close the leak-staining his boss President Obama with a daily reminder of failure.

—Bryan Walsh; see full article:

image

Deep Sea News: The Deep by PES (you want to see this)

image

Surrended U-boat 1918

image

Admiral Nakhimovn – North German Lloyd liner Berlin in New York in her original as-built condition.

The Soviet passenger ship Admiral Nakhimov was built by Bremer Vulkan in 1925 for North German Lloyd as their transatlantic liner Berlin. On 13 November 1928 she rescued 23 passengers from the British liner Vectris (Vestris ?), after it foundered off the American Coast.

When North German Lloyd introduced newer and faster liners into the mail service, Berlin was relegated to secondary duties until she was laid-up in Bremerhaven in 1938. The following year she was chartered for two “Kraft durch Freude”, (Strength through Joy) workers cruises before being selected to be taken over by the German Navy. Off Swinemünde however, she suffered a boiler explosion that killed 17 crew members. Berlin was repaired in Hamburg and fitted out as a Hospital Ship.

image

1947 Johnson Line brochure (composite)

*click thru to see images of the interior, passenger areas and accommodations

Johnson Line; Sweden
(Johnsonlinjen – Rederi AB Nordstjernan)


image

Ferry crew in the bridge – Glass plate negative

image

LEFT – “sasha lives in spokane, which isn’t that far, but still. this is a blue-ringed octopus, which is one of the most venomous animals in the world and will totally fuck you up. one bite will kill you in 60 seconds, and it carries enough venom to kill 26 adults. oh, and if it’s not close enough to bite, well then it can squirt venom at things in the water. the lesson here is DON’T EVER GO INTO THE OCEAN.”  RIGHT – (more)

ryanmasontattoos.com – portland, OR

image

Frank Senior, sculler – (Glass plate negative) –  Wooden Rowing Shells on Flickr

image

Vintage Technology: Sextante

image

Voyage To The Bottom Of The Sea Comic Book Cover

image

Next (above) is a fine (1930s? but read on) image, of the ‘Robert Thompson & Sons Limited’ shipyard in the foreground & of the ‘Sir James Laing & Sons Limited’ shipyard across the river with the Ayres Quay area behind it.  SEE FULL SIZE

A correspondent has suggested that the image, of ‘Laing’s Bend’, dates to the 1930s, before Laings built their main berth launching downstream. ‘Robert Thompson’, went out of business in 1930, so the image may date, in fact, from even earlier. But …. Geoff Bethell, of New Zealand, advises that he has enlarged the image particularly in the centre top area where a bridge is faintly visible. Geoff indicates that he cannot spot any indication of another bridge behind the railway bridge. Which would adjust the image dating to the late 1920s at the latest – since from 1927 to 1929 the road bridge with its distinctive arch was being built to replace the previous road bridge that had no arch at all.

The image I show is not even, of the entire available image! Newcastle Libraries have kindly provided, on ‘Flickr’, a large series of images mainly Newcastle related. But this splendid image of Sunderland is included. Thanks so much Newcastle Libraries! You can see the whole set here & can see this particular image here.

image

Giant icebergs head to watery end at island graveyard

BBC News – South Georgia is the place where colossal icebergs go to die.

The huge tabular blocks of ice that frequently break off Antarctica get swept towards the Atlantic and then ground on the shallow continental shelf that surrounds the 170km-long island.

As they crumble and melt, they dump billions of tonnes of freshwater into the local marine environment. UK scientists say the giants have quite dramatic impacts, even altering the food webs for South Georgia’s animals.

Those familiar with the epic journey of Ernest Shackleton in 1916 will recall that it was at South Georgia that the explorer sought help to rescue his men stranded on Elephant Island.

image

Scintilla Battery Ad circa 1933 – Philips Mini-watt vacuum tube box circa 1938

image

USS Marine Serpent, Bremerton, Washington 1950s

This ship was commissioned right at the end of World War II having been launched at Vancouver, Washington, in June 1945. She carried troops back and forth across the Pacific Ocean after the end of the War, and later she transported troops as part of the Korean War.

This photo was most likely taken between 1952-1954 as she was bring troops into Bremerton, Washington.  see full size

image

Underwater

Any good books on The Restoration, naval or otherwise?

imageBoatswains and Bacteremia – I recently completed J.D. Davies’ fiction work, Gentleman Captain, my first foray into the world of naval historical fiction, and thoroughly enjoyed it.  I am preparing a review of it shortly, but wanted also to ask readers if they had any recommendations on books pertaining to this period in British history?  I am mainly referring to the period involving Oliver Cromwell, the Commonwealth, and the eventual Restoration of the monarchy.

The books can be naval-related, as is my interest, however, if anyone can suggest a quality work that covers this time period well, I would love to hear it.  I am looking to broaden my understanding and knowledge of this period as Davies’ work has really piqued my interest.  Davies’ historical knowledge shines through in the book, so anyone with an interest in this time period would likely enjoy it.  He explained much of the geo-political flavor of the time, but really left me wanting to learn more (a compliment to his writing in my opinion!)

So, any suggestions?

image

Ink II by Julian Callos via thingsihappentolike

image

deepwaterwriter – heavy weather and impending coffee; Winter gale in the Mediterranean – See his tumbler »

image

Royal Navy Alphabet (click to see whole set) – This is from one of my dad’s childhood books dating from the first world war. Interesting to see what was aimed at children in Britain during that conflict. Here is an interesting account of the Emden and what became of her: www.argo.net.au/andre/emdenforwebENFIN.htm

image

Coaling North Dakota; ca. 1910-1915; glass negative (see full size)

image

USS Red Oak rope

image

Modern Mechanix – Yesterday’s Tomorrow Today »

image

Marieaunet: Weegee – Couple d’amoureux au cinéma – c. 1950via mudwerks

image

English Russia photo spreadSoviet Soldiers at World War 2 in Color

image

USS Topeka (CLG-8)

Fires a Terrier guided-missile on 18 November 1961, during weapons demonstrations for the Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral George W. Anderson. Photographed from on board USS Kitty Hawk (CVA-63). Planes preparing for launch on the carrier’s flight deck are a F8U Crusader jet fighter, at left, and an AD-6 Skyraider attack plane in the lower center.

image

80 beats – Last week the Navy took its best shot–and it was a doozy. The shot, fired on December 10th, broke the world record for the most powerful shot, as the 23-pound aluminum projectile rocketed out of the Navy’s electromagnetic railgun at a reported speed of Mach 7, or seven times the speed of sound.

image

Clarence chimneys; early 1990s – This is the Liverpool skyline on the morning the Clarence Dock chimneys were blown up. Unfortunately, I didn’t put the date on this enlargement, and can’t remember it.The view is certainly different today.

image

Olympic and Mauretania headed to the breakers in 1935 »

image

Bottles of rhum

image

Sperm Whale vs Giant Squid: A death metal match beneath the sea »

image

SS Baria; 108 metres long, speed of 11 knots; built 1890

WOOPSIE – A difficult launch, it would appear. Built for Hamburg-Calcutta-Linie, of Germany. In 1900 renamed Kambyses. On Oct. 6, 1902, Captain Grimm in command, was wrecked at Punta Guionos, Costa Rica, while en route from Puget Sound, to Hamburg, via San Francisco & S. American ports. Her cargo included 5,000 cases of canned salmon bound for Europe, also coal for S. America & flour.

image

Photo Project by OneEighteen

I’ve been working on several projects lately. One has been some big prints for Manchester Terminal here on the ship channel. It’s an old cotton warehouse that is still used for cargo on the ship channel side, but has been converted to office space on the highway side. The whole building is around a million square feet of space. The corridors are so large that the owner wanted really big prints so they wouldn’t be dwarfed by the open space. I was pretty spooked about this much enlargement, but I had admired some prints done for the Museum of Fine Arts here in Houston and they put me in contact with Houston Photo Imaging (HPI) who printed and mounted the 8 x 12 foot photo here. When finished we should have about nine of these up.

For those who want tech data, this was shot in July 08 with a Nikon D300 using the 70-200 mm lens at full zoom. It has been slightly cropped. The ppi as printed was only 23 (kudos to HPI).  go seesuper humongo-sized

image

“Bow Flower” and “Iver Experience” at anchor – Taken in Bolivar Roads. Houston Ship Channel by OneEighteen go see

image

Typical 5Kw Radio Operator’s Room Circa 1913

The photograph above is from the Marconi Yearbook for 1913 and show a typical setup for a liner like RMS Morea

image

postcard of the shipwreck Hilda

image

Marines board the MEADE; Feb. 1913 – glass plate negative

Photo shows U.S. Army transport ship Meade with American Marines mobilizing at League Island, Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, PA, in Feb. 1913, before going to Guantanamo, Cuba, in response to the Mexican Revolution

See also: Loading MEADE ; Capt. C.C. McCarthy of the MEADE

image

Falmouth Maritime MuseumLighthouse Fresnel Optics see also:

image

The Scuttlefish Guide to Oceanic Gifts – You love the ocean and you probably know someone else who loves the beach and sea, too. We haven’t really created a special list of things that might be good oceanic gifts. But we do have a few ideas!

image

from Cold is the Sea via Drinkin’ And Dronin’


imageMonkey Fist is a smack-talking, potty mouthed, Yankee hating, Red Sox fan in Portland, Maine.  In addition to compiling Maritime Monday, she blogs about nautical art, history, and marine science on Adventures of the Blackgang. Submit story ideas, news links, photographs, or items of interest to her at [email protected].  She can also out-belch any man.

Maritime Monday Archives »

Back to Main