Maritime Monday; week ending June 26, 2011

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original via feastingonroadkill

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Japan Three Months After the Quake – In this combo of two photos, a ship swept away by tsunami sits amid debris-covered residential area March 12, 2011, left, while the ship stays in the same position in the area getting cleaned up June 3, 2011 in Kesennuma, Miyagi Prefecture, northeastern Japan. Japan marks three month since the March 11 earthquake and tsunami Saturday, June 11. (Kyodo News/Associated Press)  — BIG PICTURE

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bedazzled – I am currently working on a little ferry in NYHarbor, and my shifts are afternoons and evenings, saturdays and sundays: just when the cruise ships and party yachts come out. Some of them are eyesores, so Tugster recommended that they be Dazzled! Here, then, not to confuse, nor conceal, but to liven up their dreary silhouettes—and to boost our morales, those of us on bowwatch—are the new! improved! versions of five of the ugliest vessels in NYHarbor…

keep reading on Bowsprite: A New York Harbor Sketchbook »

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dirty mapping… on cavendum a meretricibus (in German)

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Devil and the Deep (1932) – Naval commander Charles Storm has made life miserable for his wife Diana due to his insane jealousy over every man she speaks to. His obsessive behavior soon drives her to the arms of a handsome lieutenant. When Charles learns of their affair, he plots revenge.

Starring Tallulah Bankhead, Gary Cooper, Charles Laughton, and a very young Cary Grant

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Time magazine, March 17, 1941 – read the text on thegildedcentury

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Coronet magazine 1955 – Cover art by Arthur Sarnoff

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Lobstering on a Surf Board – Beating the Fuel Costvia GoodMorningGloucester (MASS)

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The Paqueboat Djenn̩ РFrom a postcard dated 1953 issued by the Compagnie de Navigation Paquet founded by one Nicholas Paquet in 1858. The Djenn̩ was built for the trade between France and North Africa, mainly on the route Marseilles- Morocco. Perhaps a more civilised way of getting there than train, bus or car across Spain and then the ferry to Tangiers.

The ship was named for a town in Mali for reasons that escape me but was a substantial piece of kit none the less. Built in 1930 at the French yard Forges et Chantiers de la Mediterraneé she displaced a touch under 9000 tons and could make 16 knots while carrying some 500 cabin passengers in three classes, 700 other passengers in “steerage” and 5000 tons of cargo.

keep reading

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Circular Quay, June 1970 – The unpopular experimental ferry Kooleen, overshadowed by the P&O liner “Oronsay” and the Sydney Harbour Bridge.  – Full Size

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Circular Quay, Sydney, 1969 – The harbour ferries Kooleen and Kameruka in the foreground with an unknown ocean liner, probably the P&O Canberra, and the harbour bridge behind. – source and full view

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Source: hookedheart

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ATLANTIC OCEAN (June 19, 2011) Sailors assigned to USS Constitution heave a line during sail training aboard Friendship of Salem. Constitution Sailors hope to use this training for the possibility of sailing Constitution under her own power for the bicentennial of the War of 1812. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Shannon Heavin/Released) – via coldisthesea

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Ardath’s Cigarettes “Photocards Series E” issued 1938
Speedboat “Bluebird” and Sir Malcolm Campbellposted by cigcardpix

Sir Malcolm Campbell (11 March 1885 – 31 December 1948) was an English racing motorist and motoring journalist. He gained the world speed record on land and on water at various times during the 1920s and 1930s using vehicles called Blue Bird. His son, Donald Campbell, carried on the family tradition by holding both land speed and water speed records. He competed in Grand Prix motor racing, winning the 1927 and 1928 Grand Prix de Boulogne in France driving a Bugatti T37A.

He set his final land speed record at the Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah on 3 September 1935, and was the first person to drive an automobile over 300 miles per hour. He set the water speed record four times, his highest speed being 141.740 mph (228.108 km/h) in the Bluebird K4. He set the record on 19 August 1939 on Coniston Water, England.
MORE ON WIKI

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Travel the Soviet Union posters (more) – via The Ticket That Exploded

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Russian sailors. Baltic Fleet. About 1948-49

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Chambered Nautilus (from Greek ναυτίλος, for sailor), Pairi Daiza, Brugelette, Belgium
photo by Hans Hillewaert (Lycaon)
Full resolution‎ (4,272 × 2,848 pixels) – more on wiki

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If you happen to be curious about what the future home of your grandchildren might look like, take a glance this concept hotel called The Ark. Russian architect, Alexander Remizov, is the mastermind behind the project. He believes that his floating “slinky,” which can hold up to 10,000 people, can have multiple uses, including a safe house for disaster relief. The prototype’s main materials are timber, steel, and high-strength ETFE plastic and it is built to handle land and/or water

THE ARK HOTEL? OR DISASTER RELIEF HOUSING? – via bluewaterblackheart

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Sailors at a Fourth of July parade in San Francisco (1935) / toterly

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HMS TRAFALGAR (Brit.) – ca. 1910-1915; posted by Library of Congress
See Also: SUFFOLK, MONARCH, COLOSSUS, and TERRIBLE

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PIRACY : Bartholomew Sharpe and William Hack, ed. c.1655-1708

via book-aesthete – An important surviving journal use to gain a pardon from Charles II for the buccaneer Bartholomew Sharpe. This unpublished manuscript is a fair transcript possibly in Sharpe’s own hand, listed as J8 in Ringrose, Howse and Alexander, “A Buccaneer’s Atlas,” in Basil Ringrose’s South Sea Waggoner (1992) p 262. It forms a “clean” and shortened version of the famous Journal kept by the English Buccaneer “Captain” Bartholomew Sharpe on his 3 year foray along the coasts of Central and South America, carefully omitting all mention of piracy, ransom and plunders against the Spanish (which would be a treasonable offense as Britain was not at war with Spain).

read more about it

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Sailing ship Chance, aground at Bluff, NZ 1902 – showing wind powered electric generator

The old “Chance”, as man of war, merchantman, and whaler for over one hundred years. In her last resting place. Bluff, N.Z. Dry plate glass negative Reference No. 1/1-001999-G De Maus Collection, Alexander Turnbull Library, National Library of New Zealand – Source: paperpirates

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Tropic Evening by Italian American artist John LaGatta (1894-1977) La Gatta was famous for his glamour girls from the 20’s through the early 40’s, published in fashion and women’s magazines – via Exotic Painting (see full size)

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Illustration by Ulisse Aldrovandi, a 16th century Bolognese naturalist. – via octopoda

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Titanic by Zoe Strauss – via bluewaterblackheart

Something seems really morbid about this.  “Weeee, I’m sliding to my death!!!”

Book: Shade it Black: Death and After in Iraq – US Marine Mortuary Affairs Unit

imageimageBy Jess Goodell with John Hearn

“Goodell says that one of the most difficult parts of the job was diagramming the body outlines of the deceased. On the body diagram, she would document identifying marks such as scars, tattoos and birthmarks. If a body part was missing or not found, Goodell was instructed to shade that part of the diagram black.

“The job stayed with Goodell day and night during her time in Iraq. “I don’t think I ever stopped smelling death when I was in Iraq,” she says. “Part of the reason that the smell seemed to linger was … being a Marine in Iraq at that time, laundry services only occurred every couple of weeks, so even if we were careful and very clean in the bunker, the smell just seemed to cling to us. It seemed to cling to our uniforms. And at least for me, once I smelled that smell of death, I just couldn’t stop smelling it.””

NPR post: http://www.npr.org/2011/06/21/137304590/death-and-after-in-iraq-memoir-of-a-mortuary

Just heard interview with this woman on Fresh Air on NPR.  Amazing.  The book sounds fascinating. I love stories about the “behind the scenes” shit people never see or think about, but gets done on a daily basis by people we never know.

She talked about reporting to IED attack sites after the smoke had cleared and her duty being to “catalog and retrieve what were often times little more than parts we had to scoop up with our hands”.

There were repeated breaks in the show where listeners were advised to use their own judgment in regards to upsetting content in the broadcast.  I was in the car listening on the way home and had a couple hard gulps myself.  –Mf.

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Robots are jerks.

blogs to follow: cryptofwrestling: 60s – 70s Pop Culture, monster magazines, toys, gum cards (non-sport), New Wave / Punk, and pro wrestling from the past. Comic books from the bronze to the golden age.

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no. 458 June 10, 1939 – posted by evertonkelly (tons more) – via mudwerks

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A century ago, Winchester Cathedral was saved by the heroic work of William Walker, a diver who worked tirelessly to shore up the historic foundations and preserve one of England’s greatest buildings.

By Stephen Stafford, BBC Local History

The story goes back to 1905 when experts discovered that parts of Winchester Cathedral were under serious threat of collapse. The Cathedral’s archeologist Dr John Crook explained why the the building was in such peril:

“There were large cracks in the masonry.  One of the pillars in the crypt in the eastern end of the Cathedral was forcing itself through the earth beneath so the vaulting was collapsing there.

“The west front of the Cathedral was in a terrible state with bits of masonry falling off.  Its conceivable that if nothing was done, the South wall could have toppled over.”

Enter William Walker…

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Happy 36th Birthday, Jaws

the scuttlefish: Today, 36 days ago, in 1975 was a day that kept many people off the beach for decades to come. It was the day that Jaws hit the theaters. And that was the movie that taught director Stephen Spielberg the power of unseen fear and the unpredictable nature of the ocean.

Read more »

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The New York Aquarium is the oldest continually operating aquarium in the United States, having opened in Castle Garden in Battery Park, Manhattan in 1896. NY Aquarium and Fire Boat; vintage postcard

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Lobsters and various preserved crustacea at the America Museum of Natural History, NY – via seamonstery

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Mantis shrimp eye could improve high-definition DVDs, holographic technology

via rhamphotheca

(PhysOrg.com) — The eye of the peacock mantis shrimp has led an international team of researchers to develop a two-part waveplate that could improve CD, DVD, blu-ray and holographic technology, creating even higher definition and larger storage density.

Peacock mantis shrimp are one of only a few animal species that can see circularly polarized light — like the light used to create 3-D movies. Some researchers believe the mantis shrimp’s eyes are better over the entire visual spectrum than any man-made waveplates.

A waveplate is a transparent slab that can alter the polarization of light because it is birefringent — exhibits double refraction. The mineral calcite, which is sometimes used as a waveplate, is birefringent. This print viewed through a calcite lens appears as doubled and slightly offset letters.

“We want to change the polarization without affecting the amount of light that gets through,” said Akhlesh Lakhtakia, Charles Godfrey Binder Professor of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Penn State.

keep reading on PhysOrg.com

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Bearded fisherman from Maine (c. 1910s) – via kari-young

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The Punisher War Journal #21 (1990) – via coldisthesea

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The 1927 shipwreck of the SS Kamloops – The shipwreck of the SS Kamloops in Lake Superior is shrouded in mystery. It was thought that there were no survivors, but six months later bodies were found on a nearby island. Apparently, survivors of the shipwreck had starved to death waiting for rescue even though nobody was looking for them.

Divers tell stories of a body that is still trapped in the engine room of the ship wreck. The story goes that in a fresh water lake, at that depth, there are no fish to eat the remains and the temperature is so low all year round, a body won’t decompose. Also, it is too dangerous to recover a body trapped that far down. So the unfortunate crewman, nicknamed “Whitey” or “Grandpa” by locals, just floats there in the engine room, perfectly preserved.

Divers who have been down to the wreck have reported strange encounters such as being followed by the body or being surprised suddenly by the body floating towards them. They say the body is ghostly white and still has it’s wedding ring on it’s finger.  more
— via fuckyeahwrecks

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=In7nAWpvjks&hl=en&hd=1]
via frothyparadise

“Come to Somalia! Because government isn’t the solution to our problems; government is the problem and now you have cholera.”

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tiki gods, only 59c. try ‘em – via Grottu

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lilacsailor

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Fairy Tales from the North by Einar Nerman (via allmermaids)