Maritime Monday for March 3rd, 2014: Heck Yeah NC Wyeth

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NC Wyeth Illustrations for The Ladies Home Journal 1920-31

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N. C. Wyeth The Courtship of Miles Standish by Longfellow (1920)

The Courtship of Miles Standish is an 1858 narrative poem by American poet and Maine-nave Henry Wadsworth Longfellow about the early days of Plymouth Colony, the colonial settlement established in America by the Mayflower Pilgrims.

The Courtship of Miles Standish was a literary counterpoint to Henry Longfellow’s earlier Evangeline (1847), the tragic tale of a woman whose lover disappears in a colonial war. Together, Evangeline and The Courtship of Miles Standish captured the bittersweet quality of America’s colonial era, still only the recent past.

The Pilgrims grimly battle against disease and Indians, but are also obsessed with an eccentric love triangle, creating a curious mix of drama and comedy. It was published in book form on October 16, 1858; it sold 25,000 copies after two months. Reportedly, 10,000 copies were sold in London in a single day.

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The Complete Poems of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow at Project Gutenberg (includes this poem)

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Cover painting by NC Wyeth; Botany Bay a 1941 novel by Charles Nordhoff and James Norman Hall

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N C Wyeth; The White Company by Arthur Conan Doyle; 1922

The White Company is a historical adventure by Arthur Conan Doyle set during the Hundred Years’ War. The story is set in England, France, and Spain, in the years 1366 and 1367, against the background of the campaign of Edward, the Black Prince to restore Peter of Castile to the throne of the Kingdom of Castile.

The novel is relatively unknown today, though it was very popular up through the Second World War. In fact, Doyle himself regarded this and his other historical novels more highly than the Sherlock Holmes adventures for which he is mainly remembered.

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more on Golden age Comic book Stories

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“We knew what was happening there…Three mutineers hanged.” Illustration by N. C. Wyeth for The Bounty Trilogy

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N C Wyeth; a few dust jackets – The Wreck of the Grosvenor (1877)

A nautical novel by William Clark Russell first published in 3 volumes. According to John Sutherland, it was “the most popular mid-Victorian melodrama of adventure and heroism at sea.” It remained popular and widely read in illustrated editions well into the first half of the 20th century. It was Russell’s best selling and most well known novel.

read The Wreck of the Grosvenor on Internet Archive

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Fall Fashion Preview: illustration by NC Wyeth for Saturday Evening Post

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N. C. Wyeth – The Scottish Chiefs by Jane Porter 1921

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N C Wyeth; a few dust jackets – A Candle in the Wilderness (1930)

Addison Irving Bacheller (September 26, 1859 – February 24, 1950) was an American journalist and writer who founded the first modern newspaper syndicate in the United States. image

N. C. Wyeth – Michael Strogoff by Jules Verne; 1927

Michael Strogoff: The Courier of the Czar is a novel written by Jules Verne in 1876. Critics consider it one of his best books.  Unlike some of Verne’s other famous novels, it is not science fiction.

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N.C. Wyeth’s “Portrait of a Young Artist,” 1936

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N C Wyeth; a few dust jackets – Captain Blood an adventure novel by Rafael Sabatini, originally published in 1922

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N C Wyeth; Pulp Covers ~ 1909-1926 The Pearl Fishers; on Golden Age Comic Book Stories

imageLes pêcheurs de perles (The Pearl Fishers) is an opera in three acts by the French composer Georges Bizet, to a libretto by Eugène Cormon and Michel Carré.

It was first performed on 30 September 1863 at the Théâtre Lyrique in Paris, and was given 18 performances in its initial run.

The friendship duet “Au fond du temple saint”, generally known as “The Pearl Fishers Duet”, is one of the best-known numbers in Western opera.

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VIDEO: Roberto Alagna & Bryn Terfel sing “Au fond du temple saint”

above rt:  Pearl Fishers by Antonio Bonamore (3,418 — 4,016 px)

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N. C. Wyeth; The Parables of Jesus by S. Parkes Cadman

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Stand and Deliver by N.C. Wyeth

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N. C. Wyeth – The Riverman by Stewart Edward White, 1908

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N. C. Wyeth & Peter Hurd: Hans Brinker or The Silver Skates; 1932

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N. C. Wyeth; Giant Squid

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N. C. Wyeth – The Horatio Hornblower Illustrations 1939-40

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Next Morning Came a Clear Day-A Hot Day, 1918 (see full size)

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Jim Bludsoe c 1912 (more)

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N.C. Wyeth: Dark Harbor Fishermen; 1943

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A 1938 painting by N.C. Wyeth of a fisherman hauling traps done during the summer in Maine

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N. C. Wyeth – Trending Into Maine by Kenneth Roberts Published by Little, Brown and Company ~ 1938 (more)

Kenneth Lewis Roberts (December 8, 1885 – July 21, 1957) was an American author of historical novels born in Kennebunk, Maine. He often wrote about his native state and its terrain. Roberts’ historical fiction often focused on rehabilitating unpopular persons and causes in American history.

In 1957, two months before his death, Roberts received a Pulitzer Prize Special Citation “for his historical novels which have long contributed to the creation of greater interest in our early American history.” He died, aged 71, in Kennebunkport.

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A New Englander by birth, Wyeth felt a connection to the rugged Maine coastline and the strong people who lived here. He brought his family from Pennsylvania to Maine for 25 summers.

Wyeth took his first painting trip to Port Clyde, Maine, in 1910 with fellow student at the Pyle School of Art, Sidney M. Chase. Ten years later, he purchased the Captain Norris Seavy House in Port Clyde, which he later renamed “Eight Bells” after a painting by Winslow Homer.

Wyeth was very interested in the paintings of Winslow Homer, who had painted the Maine coast at Prout’s Neck from the late 1880s to his death in 1910.”

N.C. Wyeth in Maine (farnsworthmuseum.org)

above: N. C. Wyeth The Island Funeral 1939

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N. C. Wyeth; Illustrations for Robinson Crusoe by Daniel DeFoe (1920)

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She Makes a Grand Light (1940)

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N. C. Wyeth; The Mysterious Island by Jules Verne (1918)

The Mysterious Island (French: L’ÃŽle mystérieuse) is a novel by Jules Verne, published in 1874. The novel is a crossover sequel to Verne’s famous Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea and In Search of the Castaways, though thematically it is vastly different from those books. An early draft of the novel, initially rejected by Verne’s publisher and wholly reconceived before publication, was titled Shipwrecked Family: Marooned With Uncle Robinson.

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The First Cargo (1910)

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(N. C. Wyeth) Westward Ho! by Charles Kingsley; 1920

Westward, Ho! is an 1855 British historical novel by Charles Kingsley, inspired in part by an Elizabethan travelogue by privateer Admiral Sir Richard Hawkins and by the Crimean War. Set initially in Bideford in North Devon during the reign of Elizabeth I, Westward Ho! follows the adventures of Amyas Leigh, an unruly child who as a young man follows Francis Drake to sea.

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NC Wyeth; Viking Ship

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Columbus Sights the New World – 1942

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A New World in View (1943)

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N. C. Wyeth – The 4 mural paintings in The First National Bank of Boston

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N. C. Wyeth The World of Music; Song Programs for Youth (1938)

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Captain John Paul Jones; 1940

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N. C. Wyeth (more) on Golden Age Comic Book Stories

Newell Convers Wyeth (October 22, 1882 – October 19, 1945), known as N.C. Wyeth, was an American artist and illustrator, and the only truly cool artist to emerge from that sordid clan.

imageDuring his lifetime, Wyeth created over 3,000 paintings and illustrated 112 books. Treasure Island was his masterpiece.

N.C. Wyeth was born in Needham, Massachusetts and was the oldest of four brothers who spent much time hunting, fishing, and enjoying other outdoor pursuits, and doing chores on their farm.

His varied youthful activities and his naturally astute sense of observation later aided the authenticity of his illustrations and obviated the need for models: “When I paint a figure on horseback, a man plowing, or a woman buffeted by the wind, I have an acute sense of the muscle strain.”

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above right: “One more step, Mr. Hands,” said I, “and I’ll blow your brains out!” Illustration by N.C. Wyeth for the 1911 edition of Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island.

On October 19th, 1945, Wyeth’s car was struck by an oncoming train at a railway crossing near his home in Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania. Wyeth and his three-year-old grandson Newell died in the accident. (source)

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Illustration by NC Wyeth – header original: N. C. Wyeth Illustrations for The Ladies Home Journal ~ 1920-31

Special Thanks to Golden Age Comic Book Stories

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