Maritime Monday for February 26th, 2018: Trading Paper

Lithograph of the U.S. Army Hospital Transport, General J.K. Barnes
According to the National Museum of Health and Medicine, The General J.K. Barnes was the first American purpose-built hospital ship, constructed during the Civil War. It was named after Surgeon-General J.K. Barnes, (July 21, 1817 – April 5, 1883) the 12th Surgeon General of the United States Army (1864–1882).
Wikipedia makes no mention of the Barnes, but lists USS Relief  (AH-1; laid down 14 June 1917 at  Philadelphia Navy Yard; commissioned 28 December 1920) as the first American purpose-built hospital ship in the U.S. Navy.
 
The U.S.A.H.S. Relief was acquired by the U.S. Army in 1898 for use in the Spanish-American War as a hospital ship, floating off of Cuba. It was later transferred to the U.S. Navy in 1902 and commissioned as the U.S.S. Relief in 1908 under Surgeon Charles F. Stokes, who commanded the Relief for service wtih the Atlantic Fleet during the around-the-world cruise in 1908. The ship waas decommissioned and became a stationary hospital ship in 1910. It was renamed the U.S.S. Repose in 1918 and then sold in 1919 for merchant service.* Sold for scrap 23 March 1948. *
Unloading patients from ambulances ready to be placed on board USS Mercy (AH-4), bound for America. 44th Ambulance Company and 9th Evacuation Ambulance Company. St. Nazaire, Loire Inferieure, France.

Previously known as SS Saratoga, a steamer for the Ward Line on the New York to Havana route, and considered the fastest steamship in coastal trade. more

other ships also named USS Mercy

Three hospital ships docked at Yokohama, Japan: Tjitjalengka (British), Marigold (U.S. Army), and Benevolence (U.S. Navy). Part of the effort processing prisoners of war held by the Japanese. August/September 1945.
 
 
phoebesonder on Instagram (via Meaddows Ryan)
and uses a Boston Red Sox glass to hold her paint-water. Typical fukkin’ New Yorker.
 
Smithsonian Magazine – Lincoln’s original patent model was acquired by the Smithsonian in 1908. This replica was built by the Smithsonian in 1978 for long-term display to preserve the fragile original.
Before he became the 16th president of the United States, Lincoln, who had a long fascination with how things worked, invented a flotation system for lifting riverboats stuck on sandbars. He remains the only U.S. president to have a patent in his name. Lincoln’s patent, No. 6,469, was granted on May 22, 1849, for a device for “Buoying Vessels Over Shoals.”
Lincoln “was keenly interested in water transportation and canal building, and enthusiastically promoted both when he served in the Illinois legislature,” claims the chair of the Division of Politics and Reform at National Museum of American History. His idea? To equip boats with inflatable bellows of “india-rubber cloth, or other suitable water-proof fabric” levered alongside the hull.  more
Anonymous, section detail of “Geigyo Hinshu Zukan” (Fourteen Varieties of Whales; 1760) Courtesy New Bedford Whaling Museum)
The importance of whaling (in Japan) to the local economy and cultural traditions is evident in companion exhibitions at the New Bedford Whaling Museum, Enlightened Encounters: The Two Nations of Manjiro Nakahama and The East Unlocks its Gates: American Whalers and Trade in Asia. Together, they explore Japanese whaling culture in the first half of the 19th-century as it was contemporaneous to the burgeoning American whale fishery.
Vintage Matchbook: Daiwa Match Company; Japan

and yeah, that  looks an awful lot like Portland Head Light

With Germany in tatters and his business bankrupt, Oskar Speck got into his kayak in 1932 for what would become an epic, seven-and-a-half-year paddle—30,000 miles, packed with hero’s welcomes and near-death escapes, all the way to Australia.

From Nazi Germany to Australia: The Incredible True Story of History’s Longest Kayak Journey

Vintage Postcard: Monongahela River, Showing Coal Barges and Steamers – Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. Postmark: August 21, 1907 – Vintage Views of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Player’s Cigarettes Trading Card: “Fire-Fighting Appliances” #16 Steam fire-float of 1874. Series issued in 1930
#47 “Monitor” jet on motor fire-float “Beta III”
Wills’s Cigarettes “Engineering Wonders” (issued in 1927) #6 Bucket Dredger
Wills, Engineering Wonders, 1927. #17 Electric Unloader
Wills’s Cigarettes “Engineering Wonders” (series of 50 issued in 1927) Left: #39 Framing a Liner – Right: Revolving Floating Crane

Topical Cigarette Trading Cards: Science & Engineering

Vintage Matchbook: Ships of Science: Kosmonavt Vladimir Komarov (8/9) Russia; 1976
Kosmonavt Vladimir Komarov was a satellite tracking ship of the Soviet Union; named after Vladimir Mikhaylovich Komarov, the cosmonaut who died on Soyuz 1.

Originally built as an ordinary cargo ship in 1966; converted in Leningrad in 1967; decommissioned in 1989. More images and more info on Shipspotting

  more about the ship on globalsecurity.org

The Ships of Science collection of Vintage Soviet Matchbooks on Flickr:

In 1986, the Kosmonavt Yuriy Gagarin was the world’s largest communications ship.

starboard view of a Soviet space control/monitoring ship Kosmonavt Yuriy Gagarin underway

and on a matchbook

Weird and Intense Vintage Soviet Space Postcards (perfect for airbrushing on the side of your make-out van)

World Navies Today: Russian Civilian Scientific & Support Vessels; Academy of Sciences

Vintage Antarctica Post and QSL Cards: UA1KAE; Mirny Station, Antarctica (USSR Antarctic Expedition) – rt: UV3BC/M – Mirny Station, Antarctica
Photo of a Russian Polar schooner Zarya crew. The first Zarya was a steam- and sail-powered brig used by the Russian Academy of Sciences for a polar exploration during 1900–1903.

Things didn’t go well.

Krazy Kats and Krazy Kittens! In case you missed last week’s Big Roll Out, Maritime Monday’s own Miss MonkeyFist now has 2 exclusive, Slap-My-Ass-and-Call-Me-Gertrude-Tastic t-shirts now available for purchase in the gCaptain Boutique!

Jolly Roger and Mermaid. Get yours TODAY…

And Thanks to those who already have!

Museum of Found Photos