Maritime Monday; week ending August 21, 2011

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USS Recruit, also known as the Landship Recruit

wooden mockup of a dreadnought battleship constructed by the United States Navy in the Manhattan borough of New York City, as a recruiting tool and training ship during the First World War.  Commissioned as if it were a normal vessel of the U.S. Navy and manned by a crew of trainee sailors.  The New York Times reported at the time that the “Landship” had helped the U.S. Navy recruit 25,000 men into the service—625 times the size of her own crew.

more on How to be a Retronaut »

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south street • manhattan • photo by Peter Manzari

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Darthula II and P&O’s Pride of Hampshire Photo: © Ian Boyle – full size original – River Thames

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The icebreaking steamer Baikal was built in 1896 – shown here on lake Baikal, Central Siberia – Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums

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this shall weigh more than the vaulting sea – Panorama of the Yamagiri Maru. Truk Lagoon, Micronesia. – photo by adamOriginal (1024 x 650) – see also: Bow of the Nippo Maru at about 40m

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hand colored engraved fish from a Jardine book about 1850

Sir William Jardine (1800-1874) made natural history available to all levels of Victorian society by editing and issuing the hugely popular forty volumes of The Naturalist’s Library (1833-1843). The 40 volumes is divided into four main sections: Ornithology (14 volumes), Mammalia (13 volumes), Entomology (7 volumes), and Ichthyology (6 volumes); each prepared by a leading naturalist.

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1956 Oldsmobile Golden Rockethellformotorsvia dirtyriver

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Hawaiian Paipo Board; Early 1900’s with hand grooves. Made of Koa wood.

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(left) 10th printing 1971 – (right) ©1979 / Illustration: Gil Cohen (Espionage & Action Art Gallery)

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Sleeping on the Job on The Big Picture

Jaseem, a taxi driver, sleeps with a fluorescent light on inside his cab in Mumbai on June 30, 2011. The practice of keeping the light on is an indication to customers that even though the driver is resting, the cab is available for hire. (Danish Siddiqui/Reuters) #

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Warship Week

Warship Weeks were British National savings campaigns during the Second World War, with the adoption of a Royal Navy warship by a civil community.[1] A level of savings would be set to raise enough money to provide the cost of building a particular naval ship. The aim was for cities to raise enough to adopt battleships and aircraft carriers, while towns and villages would focus on cruisers and destroyers. Smaller towns and villages would be set a lower figure. Once the target money was saved for the ship, the community would adopt the ship and its crew.

Local charity organisations, churches and schools would provide the crews of the adopted ship with gloves, woollen socks and balaclavas. Children would often write letters and send cards to the crew.[3] When possible, officers and men from the adopted ship would visit the local community. To celebrate their visit, a parade would often be organised in their honour.

A community would sponsor a ship through individual savings in government bonds and national savings certificates. The campaigns were organised by the National War Savings Committee with the full support of the Admiralty. There were a total of 1,178 warship weeks organised during the campaign’s duration, involving a total of 1,273 districts. A press announcement quoted the adoption of eight battleships, four carriers, forty-nine cruisers, three hundred and one destroyers, twenty-five submarines, one hundred and sixty-four corvettes and frigates and two hundred and eighty-eight minesweepers.

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Ilford Warship Week – HMS Urchin (full size)

Ilford Borough raised enough money to for a Royal Navy destroyer, H.M.S URCHIN. This ship fought throughout WW II , surviving till 1964 when she was scrapped.

HMS Urchin (R99) was a U-class destroyer of the British Royal Navy that saw service during World War II. She was later converted into a Type 15 fast anti-submarine frigate, with the new pennant number F196. She served off Iceland during the ‘Cod wars’ in 1959.  -wiki

Urchin image source

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Oseberg ship / Norway (Set: 5) Viking Ship Museum, Oslo

The Oseberg ship is a well-preserved Viking ship discovered in a large burial mound at the Oseberg farm near Tønsberg in Vestfold county, Norway. The ship’s interment into its burial mound dates from 834, but parts of the ship date from around 800, and the ship itself is thought to be older.

more on wiki

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… I figured I’d share the scrimshaw on my knife handle that I did a bit ago. I chose Surprise for the front because she was the first ship I sailed as Sail Crew. And, well, it’s Surprise. I added a rose to her name to acknowledge her time as the Rose, of course. The compass rose on the other side was my very first scrimshaw. I wanted a design that would be simple to do and contained mostly straight lines, so that I couldn’t mess it up too badly…

keep reading on spiffingsailor »

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Skin Diver Suite and Other Selections; Leo Diamond, Harmonica, With Orchestra Conducted by Murray Keliner, 1956 – via vintagegal

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Boarded up for tripsee also

The Delta Queen was purchased by Tom Greene in 1946 and was towed thru the Panama Canal to Cincinnati, (The Queen was the only paddle wheeler to traverse the Panama Canal). The famous Captain Frederick Way Jr. was in charge of bringing the Delta Queen back to Cincinnati.

Steamboats on the Ohio River

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Officers’ smoking room, Lusitania

Southern Methodist University, Central University Libraries, DeGolyer Library; see the Flickr set of 20 interiors

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26th Amphibious Car Meet in Switzerland

This week, owners of more than 50 amphibious vehicles brought their World War 2-era military transporters, jeeps and vintage-style cars to Switzerland‚ St Blaise for their annual European gathering. Fitted with colourful sun umbrellas and decorated with flags, what looked like a motley crew of vehicles carrying families including babies and dogs drove off the port and glided smoothly into the water, before moving across Lake Neuchatel.  more

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Pacific Ocean – Yeoman 2nd Class Nelson Munoz of Los Angeles, Calif., mans the Damage Control Console and monitors reporting alarms around the ship during a general quarters (GQ) drill aboard the guided missile cruiser USS Shiloh (CG 67). Shiloh (was at that time) deployed to the Western Pacific Ocean with the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) Carrier Strike Group. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate 3rd Class Bernardo Fuller (RELEASED)

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S.S. John Brown (set)photo by Pat Gavin

Kincaids Built The Sultan of Trincanu One of the Stern Wheelers built in the late 1800’s by John G Kincaid of Greenock, Renfrewshire, Scotland.

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Birdseye map of New York City by United States Printing & Lithograph Co. – 1912

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Delisle’s map of the Mississippi River, 1702 on Big Map Blog

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Belfast SS colour card of Ulster Monarchfull size

Harland and Wolff Standard Motorships – The Ulster Monarch

In 1929, the Belfast SS Co received the first of three 3700ton Harland and Wolff motorships, the Ulster Monarch, displaying a cut down version of the standard two-funnelled outline. The second and third ships were delivered in 1930, and were named Ulster Queen and Ulster Prince. They were the world’s first diesel cross-channel ships, and a fourth ship smaller ship, the Innisfallen, was delivered for the City of Cork SP Co.  MORE »

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MV Columba at Coll –  vintage postcard from Scotland

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RMS Columba

Original (1320 x 813)

From 1879 to 1935, RMS Columba was MacBrayne’s flagship running from Glasgow to Ardrishaig via Rothesay and the Kyles of Bute on the first leg of what was known as “The Royal Route”.

A hangover from before when railways became dominant towards the end of the 19th century and travel by coastal steamships was a viable alternative, subsequent legs of the Royal Route were through the Crinan Canal and up to Oban (ceased 1929), then to Fort William (ceased 1970’s), then through the Caledonian Canal to Inverness (ceased after WW2).  –posted by Neil King

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A Tale of Two HemispheresAstronomy Picture of the Day

A quest to find planet Earth’s darkest night skies led to this intriguing panorama. In projection, the mosaic view sandwiches the horizons visible in all-sky images taken from the northern hemisphere’s Canary Island of La Palma (top) and the south’s high Atacama Desert between the two hemispheres of the Milky Way Galaxy.  MORE »

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Paris: Le Batofar by Night – photo by Thierry Beauvir

LV Osprey entered service as a 134 ft Light Vessel for the Commissioners of Irish Lights in 1955. On 9 May 1975 she was sold to the New Ross Harbour Commissioners for use as a floating oil berth, pilot station and harbour store. On March 1998 she was sold again and moored on the Seine.

Le Batofar ignited the “night club on boat” trend in Paris. This lighthouse boat (in French bateau-phare) offers an original setting on the bank of the Seine. It is known for its progressive musical programming which champions cutting edge electro bands live, and its renowned DJ-driven afterhours dance parties. During the day, Batofar is also a community gathering that serves as a restaurant, café and a summertime “beach” hang-out (Paris-Beach).

Official Batofar Website  —  Le Batofar on wikipedia

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Ornithologia Manetti – Hand-coloured engravings from Vol. 4 of Saverio Manetti’s 5-volume treatise on birds from 1776, on BibliOdyssey

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Hamburg Pleasure Boat, dated 21 August 1938

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A Man and his Shipfull size (1024 x 647) – found photo c. 1907-18

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Hikawa Maru by Jonathan Boonzaier

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Our Navy Magazine

First published in 1897, Our Navy Magazine covered the on-goings of the U.S. Navy.  Every issue carried intel on Naval pay, benefits, uniforms, rankings as well as casualties (typically only during war-time).  On top of being a good piece of information for all the Navy men, the magazine came equipped with some damn good covers. more

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Scotland’s New Museum of Transport and Travel (set)photos by David Dorren

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Hong Kong Museum of Coastal Defence

a museum in Hong Kong, located in a former coastal defence fort overlooking the Lei Yue Mun channel, near Shau Kei Wan on Hong Kong Island. The fort was built by the British in 1887, intended to defend the eastern approaches to Victoria Harbour.

The total area of the museum is 34,200 square metres. An exhibition entitled “600 years of Coastal Defence” is held permanently in the museum, which tells the story of the defence of the Hong Kong coastline from the time of the Ming Dynasty, through the First and Second Opium Wars and the Battle of Hong Kong, through to today.

more on wiki

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Steam excursion tug Yorkshireman at Bridlington – full size

Steel tug/excursion vessel – 251grt – 120ft long – Paddle tugs were low draft vessels ideally suited for use as pleasure steamers, but screw tugs had too great a draft for the extreme tidal conditions at ports like Bridlington. Yorkshireman was specifically designed for use at Bridlington having a much lower draft than usual. Her low draft also enabled her to assist vessels stranded on Humber sand banks during winter storms when in use as a tug.

Yorkshireman was delivered to United Towing and arrived in Bridlington in May 1928. She worked summers at Bridlington until the war when she was requisitioned and used on towage and rescue duties at Grimsby. She did not return to excursion work at Bridlington until 1947 and ran until the end of the 1955 season. Yorkshireman  worked as a tug on the Humber until 1965 when she was sold for scrap in Belgium.  more

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TSS Caledonian Princess – posted by Neil King

Early 1960s British Railways travel poster advertising ro-ro car ferry services to Ireland via Stranraer and Larne.

The ship depicted here, the turbine steamer “Caledonian Princess”, was commissioned in 1961. She served at Stranraer until 1968 and then continued her career elsewhere in the BR/Sealink network until retired in 1981. She then served as a floating nightclub named “Tuxedo Princess” on the Clyde at Glasgow and the Tyne at Newcastle. She was scrapped in Turkey in 2008.

see full size – Original (850 x 674)

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Snag Boat – These boats cleared the river of obstacles – Steamers on the Ohio River

More interesting river steamers: The Sternwheeler VirginiaVirginia in a cornfield after a floodInterior of a typical steamercrew of the steamboat Courier seated for dinnerThe Island Queen and waterfrontThe Clyde Trask Orchestra

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Parker’s Grove; the Coney Island of the west

imageIn the early 1880’s there was a beautiful apple orchard 10 miles east of Cincinnati on the New Richmond Pike next to the Ohio River. One day a group of Cincinnatians drove out the Pike to ask the owner James H. Parker if they could rent his orchard for a private picnic. They intended to charter a steamboat to take their people to and from the riverside grove.  Mr. Parker was no dummy, he realized he could make more money in renting picnic space than in selling apples.

He built a shelter house and a dance floor and called the facilities Parker’s Grove. When the apple trees died off he replaced them with maples. Parker sold his holdings in 1886 for $17,000 to steamboat captains William and Malcolm McIntyre. They headed a group of high rollers which included the president of the Cincinnati Steamboat Excursion Company Captain J. D. Hegler. The place was renamed Ohio Grove the Coney Island of the west. The park officially opened as an amusement park on Monday, June 21, 1886. It rained and only a few hundred people came instead of the thousands hoped for.

keep reading »

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Big Wheels: Captains Pattison & Dossfull image

Captain Doss was the pilot of the Island Queen. He began his career in 1886 and worked almost every steamboat run by the Coney Island Company (mostly as the pilot). The Queen’s engine room was located on the main deck and the passengers were free to wander thru the area as long as they stayed behind the iron railings. The third image shows the Queen with her hinged smoke stacks pulled down so that when the Ohio River was at a high water mark the boat could pass under all the bridges.  —more

Ohio River Main page; historic photos

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H.M.S. Duke of Yorkposted to flickr by Greg Bishop

“HMS DUKE of YORK Firing the Big Gun; 1942” – A beautiful action shot of this proud British warship. Firing a 14-inch broadside during the Battle of North Cape on 26th Dec 1943; the German battlecruiser Scharnhorst met her end under these very guns.  moreOriginal (1280 x 960)

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old sailing ship and a lone man(1400 x 1969)

any information on the name and/or location of this ship is appreciated – post to flickr page

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SUBIC BAY, Philippines (August 3, 2011) Members of USS Frank Cable (AS 40) fitness enhancement programUSS Frank Cable (AS 40) – 05AUG11 (Set: 32)

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Docking – photo taken Dublin by Balázs Tóth

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Claymore – En route between Castlebay and Oban, late 80’s; MacBrayne’s Ships Set – Original (1843 x 1225)

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To the River Plate and back – New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons,1913 – BioDivLibrary

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The Pier; Old Orchard Beach, Maine – photo by coreytempleton

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Andrew Strang & Company advert 1924

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Deep Sea Divers – from The Standard Edition

Song of the Week

Augustus Pablo – East of the River Nile 1971

Horace Swaby (June 21, 1954 – May 18, 1999), better known as Augustus Pablo, was a Jamaican roots reggae and dub record producer, melodica player and keyboardist, active from the 1970s onwards. He popularized the use of the melodica (an instrument at that time primarily used to teach children music in the Jamaican public schools) in reggae music.  (more on wiki)

go download the albumHerman Chin Loy – Western Chinese Reggay


Maritime Monday is compiled by Monkey Fist

Monkey Fist is a smack-talking, potty mouthed, Yankee hating, Red Sox fan in Portland, Maine.  In addition to compiling Maritime Monday, she blogs about nautical art, history, and marine science on Adventures of the Blackgang and The Scuttlefish

Submit story ideas, news links, photographs, or items of interest to her at [email protected].  She can also out-belch any man.

The Maritime Monday Archives


And remember…

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London Passenger Transport Board; 1942

Header image: The Gem; November 27th, 1937; see original » / from British Story Papers