Maritime Monday; September 12, 2011

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JJ and the Captain

OneEighteen – Capt. JJ Hensley (with coffee cup) talks to the tugs as he turns the ship off the dock. The captain does not look comfortable. This is often the case with big ships in little basins. Sea captains like lots of empty water between them and anything solid.

I almost passed this one by, but a friend who’s not in the industry was all over it. It tells a story to him that I took for granted. Taken on the Houston Ship Channel.

more new photos »

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Greetings from Mobile, Alabama – Large Letter Postcard c. 1940s

see also: Greetings from Lakeside, Ohio, on Lake Erie

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Schooner Festival; Hull to hull coverage on Shooting my Universe

(above) The pinky schooner Ardelle – See also: Fame of Salem Pt I

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Strange Maps: Vertical Panorama: the Rhine and the Birth of Tourism

Modern tourism is born of the Grand Tour. From the 17th century onwards, the Brahmins of Britain travelled across the Continent for the twin purposes of education and entertainment. The Tour, an itinerant master class in antique culture and contemporary manners, gained popularity throughout the subsequent centuries. The concept of leisure travel spread to other national elites, and to the middle classes. Eventually, with the onset of mass transport and paid holidays, it came within reach of the working classes.

‘Tourism’ – a word first appearing in print in 1822 – quickly turned professional, attested by the rapid spread during the 19th century of Hotel Bristol as a generic name for overnight accommodation for the weary tourist. Tourism also produced a new type of cartography – the tourist map. These were explicitly designed to be alluring, to include and reflect the leisurely enjoyment of travel.

keep reading »

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J. Allen St John; Pulp Covers 1940-49Phantom Lady, Art by Matt Baker

see also: Blue Beetle Bugs The Squids

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Birdseye view of Boston, compliments of Beach and Clarridge Co.Big Map Blog
Birdseye View of Puget Sound – 1891

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How the Civil War Made the Maine Coast a Backwater

The wartime clash between the ironclads Monitor and Merrimac was a death knell for the Age of Sail, and with it our coast’s shipbuilding and shipping sectors. To make matters worse, after the war the commerce of the nation began moving east to west on the expanding railroads, which were slow to come up the coast on account of the many rivers and estuaries and the shortage of people.

keep reading on Working Waterfront »

G.W. Morris’ birds’ eye view of Peaks Island, Maine in 1886 on Big Map Blog

above image: View of Portland Harbor, 1853; Maine Historical Society

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Entrance to Portland Harbor, Maine Looking SE from observatory on Munjoy Hill

Robert N. Dennis collection of stereoscopic views Full resolution‎ (2,737 × 1,572 pixels) also: View at Cushing Island, Portland Harbor, Maineand On the beach, Cushing Island, Portland Harbor, Maine

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Portland Marine Society Membership Certificate Circa 1805

Nineteenth Century Portland Landmarks; maps & engravings, Univ of Southern Maine collection

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Whiskey Island Coast Guard Station

Cleveland, Ohio. from Roadside Architecture:

“I hope restoration work is still going forward. I hate to see things like this go to waste. This reminds me of the sea museum in San Francisco.”

From Roadside:

The Whiskey Island Coast Guard Station was built in 1940. It has been abandoned since 1976 except for a brief stint as a nightclub known as The Island. The building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Restoration work was begun in 2009. It will be used as a maritime and Coast Guard museum.

decoarchitecture via coldisthesea

Coast Guard station at Whiskey Island on wikipedia

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Pleasure Pavilion: 1910 on Shorpy

The Jersey Shore circa 1910. “Steel Pier, Atlantic City.” 8×10 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company. View full size.

See also:

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Vintage Nautical Matches  Upper LUpper RLower LLower R

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above: More ads from 1970s comics – below: 45 years ago: The first issue of TV21

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Video: Stingray TV intro (1964)

Gerry Anderson’s third SF supermarionation saga told the adventures of the WASPs (the World Aquanaut Security Patrol) as they explored the oceans and kept the world safe from a variety of perils. The WASP’s main weapon was Stingray, a super-sub under the command of Troy Tempest. Troy’s copilot was Phones, and they were often joined on missions by Marina, a princess of the undersea kingdom of Pacifica.

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Postcard Newhaven South East, Le Steamer La Manche, Dampfer

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géographie en images; 1949 (Set: 42) noirmoutier marée haute

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grottu: In 1956, Henry Behrens was the world’s smallest man. Here he is dancing with his cat.

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Crypt of Terror: Model Nephew

If I taught a college course on EC Comics this story would fit into EC 101. It’s EC’s most common plot: guy kills somebody who has a hobby/lifestyle/job, etc., that defines him, then justice is served in a horrible fashion to the murderer by a form of that which the victim did. In this case a spoiled nephew kills his rich uncle whose hobby is building ships in bottles. You can guess the rest. Read the comic on Pappy’s Golden Age Comics Blogzine »

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HMS Britannia – Fencing / Rapier Exercises, 1899 – 1900

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Airplane Crash Victims Found at Sea Thanks to iPhone Signal

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guerin para

Color plates from a French dictionary of natural history published in Paris in 1834

Felix Edouard Guerin-Meneville (1799-1874) was a natural history scientist, specializing in entomology. He published several volumes of his “Picturesque Dictionary of Natural History” in the spirit of the “19th Century Collector’s Cabinets” in their wide-ranging investigations of natural phenomena and interest in exotic or unknown species. The highly decorative plates of his work are vividly hand colored engravings which are an eclectic collection of curious and wonderful images of birds, fish, insects, flowers and people.  more »

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Beagle – In het kielzog van Darwin

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Stad Amsterdam – the Dutch Beagle (Set: 13)

Simon Gurr – On 1st September 2009 the clipper Stad Amsterdam set off on a voyage around the world, following the route Charles Darwin took for his momentous Beagle voyage. The film crew on board Stad Amsterdam, from Dutch TV company VPRO, spent eight months making an epic series ‘The Future Of Species’ which sought to update the scientific discoveries of the original Beagle voyage and at the same time assessed the state of our oceans and our prospects for survival. I was lucky enough to be invited to the launch day and spent a couple of hours on board the clipper. more »

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Beagle en el Canal Magdalena Tierra Del Fuego 1834Set: 1834 Darwin a su paso por Chile (Set: 27)

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1863, foto de la Expedicion Española (Valparaíso, Images of the old Port)

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Valparaíso is a city in Chile, and one of the country’s most important seaports and an increasing cultural center in the Southwest Pacific hemisphere.  Valparaíso played an important geopolitical role in the second half of the 19th century, when the city served as a major stopover for ships traveling between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans by crossing the Straits of Magellan. Always a magnet for European immigrants, Valparaíso mushroomed during its golden age, when the city was known by international sailors as “Little San Francisco” and “The Jewel of the Pacific.” The opening of the Panama Canal and reduction in ship traffic dealt a staggering blow to Valparaíso, though the city has staged an impressive renaissance in recent years.  –more on wiki »

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The Argonauticon by Gaius Valerius Flaccus Paris

Printed by Josse Bade in Paris in 1519, this picture illustrates the beginning of the epic which recounts Jason’s quest for the golden fleece. The Argo is being built in the background, while Jason and the Greek heroes set sail, soothed by the music of Orpheus. The work is dedicated to the Emperor Vespasian and is in part intended to celebrate his achievements in establishing Roman rule in Britain.  more »

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The main dynamics of the U.S. technological mobilization for war.
The chains represent direct advisory connections.
Infographic by Antonio Petruccelli for Fortune magazine in 1942
Found here – via sisterwolf

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World at the time of CabotOriginal

A typical example of the decorative map work of MacDonald Gill as seen in the 1924 ‘Pageant of Empire’ – a lavish volume with ‘stirring scenes’ of empire illustrated by Spencer Pryse and Frank Brangwyn, a presentation volume for the London & North Eastern Railway.

A Tempting Maritime Read

imageA biography of an infamous seafarer by another seafarer, at last.

The Australian Age has run  a very warm review of Bligh, Master Mariner by Australian yachtsman, journo, and maritime historian Rob Mundle.

It concludes:

“Mundle’s Bligh is a meticulously researched biography that benefits from its author’s seafaring experience and ability to write with bracing vitality of the trials faced during the age of exploration. If it does, at points, sail close to the wind of corrective hagiography, it remains a book that will gladden the heart of anyone with an interest in maritime history.”

Definitely on my must-read list, so expect my own review in due course.  Meantime, you can read an interview with the author on the Booktopia blog.

from Straddling the world of the written word »

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Port of Liverpool – aerial photograph of Birkenhead Docks, 1950s

c1950 aerial photo showing the dock system in Birkenhead (& Wallasey), part of the Mersey Docks & Harbour Board’s empire. (4062 x 3777)

see also: southern system of Docksand: northern system of Docks

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Volunteers discharging a ship in the London Docks during the General Strike of 1926

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The Manchester Guardian – advert, c1930

mikeyashworth — From the Design & Industry Association handbook – an advert for the Guardian, as is now, before it dropped the name of the city that had founded it. At this date it was still proud of its Lancastrian roots, voice and influence. Sadly no artist is shown – at the time the Manchester Guardian was using quite stylish adverts – several of this style were by the designer Edward McKnight Kauffer. (cropped image; click above to see in full)

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Crew of ML 296 – Fairmile ‘B’ Launch of Royal Navy Coastal Forces, Freetown Harbour, Sierra Leone

Coastal Forces flotillas in West Africa were primarily involved in anti-submarine and convoy protection duties. Freetown was the major hub of a vitally important supply route for the allies, bringing goods and troops from Australia, India and South Africa onwards to Gibraltar and the United Kingdom. Many ships were torpedoed in the waters off West Africa—and off Freetown in particular—by German and Italian submarines which lay in wait for passing convoys. This photograph is believed to show Fairmiles at an earlier anchorage in or close to Kroo Bay near the centre of Freetown, prior to the construction of HMS Eland and the provision of new moorings further up river at Cline Bay.

Coastal Forces’ set (6) »

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Wonder Woman 122, DC comics, 1961

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HMS Victory Captains QuartersLarge

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Petrarch Canzone France c.1525-1550

This sixteenth century manuscript on vellum consists of twelve vivid watercolours illustrating the twelve stanzas, based upon Petrarch’s Canzone, which Clément Marot published in 1533/34 under the title Visions de Pétrarque. Marot was court poet to Marguerite de Navarre and François I of France.

The emblematic visions depict a succession of idylls being destroyed by the forces of nature, reflecting the melancholic preoccupation of the poetry with the fragility and transience of the world.

more »

 

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Farthest Flung: Greetings from Tristan da Cunha

The most secluded inhabited archipelago in the world, the Tristan da Cunha islands lie 1,750 miles west of South Africa and over 2,000 miles east of South America. On the Scuttlefish

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The Last Ocean Mailship in the World: RMS St Helena

imageIt takes approximately a month to sail the 6,000 nautical mile voyage south from Portland, UK, calling at Tenerife and Ascension Island, and then spending a number of days on St. Helena before sailing on to Cape Town. The 6,767 GT, 345-foot RMS St. Helena, built in 1989, sails with British and St. Helenian officers and crew, carrying 1,500 tons of cargo and 128 passengers.  more »

see also: FreighterCruises: Royal Mail Ship St. Helena » —  and Vessel Profile

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The Development of the Rudder, 100-1600 A.D.: A Technological Tale

The one instrument which all ships have in common is a rudder. Until the 13th century A.D., the primary instrument used to control ships was the quarter-rudder system. Unlike the present-day rudder which is mounted on the stern, quarter-rudders were mounted on the sides of ships towards the stern. Northern shipwrights found that their system could not be adapted to the new ship designs which were continually increasing in size. This inability of northern shipwrights to adapt their system to larger ships created a technological crisis which forced them to look for a new device. The result was a rudder mounted on the stern by a hinge device called the pintle-and-gudgeon.

keep reading »

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The Animal Kingdom

based upon the writings of the eminent naturalists, Audubon, Wallace, Brehm, Wood and others. New York, Johnson & Bailey,1897. Set of 29 images»

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Is this starfish giving me the finger?photo by drsteve; Steven Trainoff Ph.D.

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Walt Disney Annual ~ 1937 on Golden Age Comic Book Stories

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El Pulpo Mechanico on Deep Sea News

This steampunk octopus justifies the entire existence of Burning Man.

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Bored? take out some of that Red Navy on your very own kitchen table…

Modern Naval Battles is a novel card game for two to six players, based on present day sea power. The games is played in “rounds,” with players taking turns to maneuver the ships in their fleets, attack opponent’s ships, and defend their own fleet against enemy attack. At the end of each round, players receive points for each enemy vessel they have sunk. The game can end when a player achieves a specific point total, or when all opposing fleets are sunk.

This game has been revised and renamed as Cold War Naval Battles and re-released (by the designers) in PDF format (free for personal, non-commercial use). The PDF files are down-loadable from http://www.relativerange.com/Relative_Range/Cold_War_Naval_Battles.html

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Shipwreck Dance

Yes, apparently there was a “shipwreck dance” over Labor Day weekend at the 55th-annual Pioneer Days in Englewood, Florida. According to the Herald-Tribune, residents “dress like survivors and head to the Shipwreck Dance.”

(This) photograph was taken at the first Shipwreck Dance in 1956. According to longtime Pioneer Days participant Bernie Reading: “You had to come dressed as if you were a shipwreck victim.

Everyone was dressed in a ridiculous manner and really let their hair down.” Looks like a great time! In any case, the announcement for this year’s dance, posted on the Pioneer Days website, is worth quoting at length:

“No one knows where the Ship will land”. On Saturday, September 3 from 7 pm to 11 pm, Englewood residents are invited to dress like a survivor and spend a few hours dancing & socializing…

Photo: Whiskey Corner’s Shipwreck Party 1st Pioneer Days 1956: From the Collection of Diana Harris

keep reading on Ships on the Shore »

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Must. Preserve. Liberty…

Dr Strange and the US Navy. Thrilling Comics No 10 – November 1940

9/11: a day between 9/10 & 9/12 by Tommy on Freedom Guerrilla

… I cannot ever forget the sensation of dangling out of a helicopter with a shotgun slung across my back and a pistol strapped to my thigh dropping onto a ship that I was supposed to stop. In those moments, I was thinking, “if we don’t do this, who will?” Of course, back then, I felt as though I was providing a thick blanket of “security” for the sheep. I felt like we all needed to sacrifice something.

Ten years later, I know a lot more. I know I never needed to be there in the first place. I know we didn’t need to sacrifice anything.

“Never forget” is an insult. We’ve never been allowed for one moment to forget, and maybe that’s the problem…

keep reading »

(animation source)

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The History Of The 20th Century – BBC Archive

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Art of the Luggage Label

Up’ta Camp:
Sebago Lake MAINE; 1730 hrs, Saturday September 10, 2011 — For Tom