Maritime Monday; week ending July 17, 2011

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Amazing Stories was an American science fiction magazine launched in April 1926 by Hugo Gernsback‘s Experimenter Publishing. It was the first magazine devoted solely to science fiction, and helped define and launch a new genre of pulp fiction.

By the end of the 19th century, stories centered on scientific inventions, and stories set in the future, were appearing regularly in popular fiction magazines. The market for short stories lent itself to tales of invention in the tradition of Jules Verne

See Amazing Stories, In Pulp on The Scuttlefish

original image: Amazing Stories on illustrateurs.blogspot.com

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Dec. 1929Feb. 1927Nov. 1930from Amazing Stories issue checklist

4 sailors survive 10 days adrift at sea

6 other crew members missing after their vessel, Ocean Star, sank on June 26. The Korean flagged Ocean Star, owned by a Dubai-based trading company, was carrying rice from Pakistan to Somalia.

Sunday, July 17, 2011 – Six crew members from a cargo ship Ocean Star sailing from Pakistan to Somalia have been missing for the past 20 days after the ship sank on June 26. In a tragic, yet amazing story, four crew members were picked up alive from the sea and brought to the UAE by a Sharjah ship after they spent 10 days adrift.

more

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Kingston Harbour, Jamaica c1933 – see Vintage Jamaica, postcards from c 1933-34

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Fyffes Line was the name given to the fleet of passenger-carrying banana boats owned and operated by the UK banana importer Elders & Fyffes Limited.

image“With the formation of Elders & Fyffes Ltd in 1901 it was necessary to procure suitable ships on which to transport their bananas from the West Indies to the UK. Therefore, in 1902 when the Furness Line was anxious to sell three steamships each of 2,875 gross tonnage, the new company raised the necessary funds to buy them. Named SS Appomattox, Chickahominy and Greenbriar, they were all refitted in Newcastle upon Tyne and a special cooling system installed to keep the fruit firm during the crossing.

“By the start of World War I, the Fyffes fleet had grown to 18 ships, but almost all were then requisitioned by the government for war work. During the next four years ten ships were sunk by torpedoes or mines. The company recovered quickly and less than five years after the war had achieved an even stronger position than it occupied in 1914…”

more »

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Amazing posts of Vintage US Navy Tattoos on Rivet Headvia kari-young

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marlinspike instruction via climbing-down-bokor

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beach sand yacht surfing, way back in 1917 – Extreme Sports & Weird Stunts, Part 1

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China Opens World’s Longest Sea Bridge

The Qingdao Haiwan Bridge, which was featured on Amusing Planet early this year, is open for business. State-run news channel CCTV says the bridge passed construction appraisals on Monday and the bridge and an undersea tunnel opened to traffic on Thursday.

The Qingdao Haiwan Bridge, connecting the city of Qingdao in Eastern China’s Shandong province with the suburban Huangdao District across the waters of the northern part of Jiaozhou Bay, is the longest bridge over water. The 42.5 kilometer bridge is more than 4 kilometers longer than its previous record holder – a bridge over water is the Lake Pontchartrain Causeway in Louisiana. The six-lane bridge is expected to carry over 30,000 cars a day and will cut the commute between the city of Qingdao and the sprawling suburb of Huangdao by between 20 and 30 minutes.

more »

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Get a fish’s eye view of Shark Week on Deep Sea News:

Discovery Channel’s  Shark Week is an immensely popular block of programming that focuses on our toothy buddies, the elasmobranchs.  This year Georgia Aquarium will play a central role in the theming for Shark Week, and that’s already started in the form of a new UStream feed of a special camera that’s been added to the Ocean Voyager exhibit to give people a fish’s eye view of the tank’s inhabitants…

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The Tragedy On The Volga River

above: Tourist boat “Bulgaria” floats along the Volga river outside Russian city of Samara in this August 24, 2010 file photo. Built in Czechoslovakia in 1955, the Bulgaria is one of about 100 Russian riverboats with more than 55 years of service. REUTERS/Andrey Kuzmichev – (source)

below: The Bulgaria cruise ship sank on the Volga river on July, 10. The ship carried 188 passengers including the personnel. It took the ship some minutes to sink. The tragedy occurred in Tatarstan. July 12 is announced the day of mourning. Rescue operations continue till now.

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Burma’s Nude Nymph CommandosEspionage & Action Art Gallery (via x-ray delta one)

Chris Leavens; The Moon Has Pull chrisleavens.com

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citrussucker via sailorjunkers

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Georges Lacombe (1868-1916) – Marine bleue, Effet de vagues, 1893, tempera on toile, 49 x 65 cm
Musée des Beaux-Arts de Rennes

architecturalarbiter: “He took nature and shaped it with his brushes as deliberately as he carved it in wood.Marine bleu – Effet de vagues models shapeliness on canvas as well as any sculptor could chisel from marble. From the three primary colors, Lacombe created waves fringed with peacock feathered turbulence, flying up in pink mist, as though pointing toward their source in the clouds.

The high horizon may be borrowed from the Japanese prints that Lacombe loved, but it suits Lacombe’s intentions. This, like Lacombe’s other paintings, is the coast of Finistere as he experienced it. To be sure, the drama was there in Camaret-sur-mer. The colors were Lacombe’s invention but the ocean crashing against jagged rocks was an unceasing natural drama.”  —VIA

full size (click image) – Georges Lacombe Works Online; Artcyclopedia

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HMS Endeavour off the coast of New Holland, by Samuel Atkins – via mowie

This 1794 painting shows the crew of HMB Endeavour in longboats attempting to pull the ship free from a reef. Courtesy: National Library of Australia

HMS Endeavour, also known as HM Bark Endeavour, was a British Royal Navy research vessel commanded by Lieutenant James Cook on his first voyage of discovery, to Australia and New Zealand from 1769 to 1771.

Launched in 1764 as the collier Earl of Pembroke, she was purchased by the Navy in 1768 for a scientific mission to the Pacific Ocean, and to explore the seas for the surmised Terra Australis Incognita or “unknown southern land”. Renamed and commissioned as His Majesty’s Bark the Endeavour, she departed Plymouth in August 1768, rounded Cape Horn, and reached Tahiti in time to observe the 1769 transit of Venus across the Sun.

She then set sail into the largely uncharted ocean to the south, stopping at the Pacific islands of Huahine, Borabora, and Raiatea to allow Cook to claim them for Great Britain. In September 1769, she anchored off New Zealand, the first European vessel to reach the islands since Abel Tasman‘s Heemskerck 127 years earlier. In April 1770, Endeavour became the first seagoing vessel to reach the east coast of Australia, when Cook went ashore at what is now known as Botany Bay.

keep reading

see also: Captain Cook’s Journal During the First Voyage Round the World at Project Gutenberg

Endeavour runs aground, Pictures and information about the discovery of Endeavour’s ballast and cannons on the ocean floor off Queensland, Australia, in 1969

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The Last Victorian Leviathan Steam Ship

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Jewish refugees 1951 by Ruth Orkin – via hoodoothatvoodoo

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lysergicandfriends

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L: Riders of the Sea by Anne Hepple; paperback edition (1960). First published 1939. – RT: Captain Rebel by Frank Yerby; Cover art by Marchant. Four Square Books paperback (1960). First published 1957. More in Non-Mystery Covers

CNTR: The Sailcloth Shroud by Charles Williams; Cover art by Bradley Clark; design by One Plus One Studio. A Perennial Library paperback from Harper & Row (1983). First published 1960. Crime & Mystery Covers (Set: 142)

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 Giant Pacific Octopus Loves His Mr Potato Head Toy

octopoda: A giant Pacific octopus living in a Cornish aquarium has formed an unlikely bond with a child’s plastic toy. Louis regularly plays with the Mr Potato Head figure which was given to him as part of an enrichment project at Newquay’s Blue Reef Aquarium.

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Rope & Ferry, Portland, Maine by coreytempleton

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Old Orchard Beach arcade novelty photo souvenir –  burritobreath via kari-young

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one of 850 officers and men on board USS New Hampshirevia kari-young

The second United States Navy New Hampshire (BB-25) was a Connecticut-class battleship. New Hampshire was the last American pre-dreadnought battleship, though she was commissioned two years after HMS Dreadnought.

New Hampshire trained United States Naval Academy midshipmen off New England in the next two summers, and patrolled off strife-torn Hispaniola in December 1912. From 14 June-29 December 1913, she similarly protected United States’ interests along the Mexican coast, to which she returned on 15 April 1914 to support the occupation of Veracruz. New Hampshire sailed north on 21 June and was overhauled at Norfolk.

more: Maritimequest USS New Hampshire BB-25 Photo Gallery

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The USS New Hampshire (1905-1921) off New York City – full size

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Willem van de Velde Sketching a Sea Battle

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Rachel L. Carson – The Sea Around Us; 1954 – Great Murder Stories (Anthology) 1948
from Robert Jonas (1907-1997) American Artist and Illustrator set

Sackler Gallery postpones controversial “Shipwreck” show

fuckyeahwrecks: After months of discussion, the Sackler Gallery announced Tuesday it was postponing an exhibition of artifacts from the Tang Dynasty that were recovered in a shipwreck.

The exhibition was due to open in March 2012.

“Shipwrecked: Tang Treasures and Monsoon Winds” drew strong criticism from experts in underwater archeology and cultural heritage groups who argued that the excavation of the boat had not meet the field’s standards. They also contended that a show at the Sackler, which is part of the Smithsonian Institution, would seem to give approval to what they considered objectionable methods…  MORE

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Atomic Surgery: Devils of The Deep (1940)Blue Ribbon Comics #3, Jan. 1940 (MLJ) – Script: George Nagle, Art: Edd Ashe

Researchers Find Rare Earths in Pacific Ocean Mud

Discover Magazine: Researchers have found high concentrations of rare earth metals, essential materials for making nearly all high-tech electronics, in mud on the floor of the Pacific Ocean, according to study published online earlier this week in Nature Geoscience. These huge deposits could help satisfy ever-increasing demand for rare earth metals, but there are major questions about the economic viability and ecological effects of mining the sea

keep reading

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grottu

NPR: U.N. Panel Sets Emissions Standards For Cargo Ships

(July 15, 2011) – About 50,000 cargo ships carry 90 percent of world trade; most of the ships are powered by heavily polluting oil known as bunker fuels. The new rules, from a powerful committee of the International Maritime Organization, attack a growing source of greenhouse gases. The new regulations say it will be up to the ship builders to decide how they would meet the new standards…

keep reading

also: EU proposes to slash sulphur emissions from ships

Friday, 15 July 2011 – The proposal would cut the maximum permissible sulphur content of fuels to 0.1 percent from 1.5 percent from 2015 in sensitive areas such as the Baltic Sea and the Channel, and to 0.5 percent from 4.5 percent from 2020 in all other areas.

“This proposal is an important step forward in reducing emissions from the fast-growing maritime transport sector,” EU Environment Commissioner Janez Potocnik said in a statement.

As well as slashing sulphur dioxide emissions, the proposal would cut fine particle emissions from ships by up to 80 percent, the Commission said.

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fuckyeahcartography: Takamitsu Shimomura, 1879, Yokohama-shi, Japan – full size

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Sebago Lake, Maine – 1830 hrs; 12 July 2011 (full size) – photo by Monkey Fist

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Shipwrecked sailors attacked by man-eating sharks; Sea and Land by J. W. Buel, 1889

Beth Van Hoesen; Bay Boats, 1988 – Aquatint, etching, dry point tinted with watercolor – link

Pictorial exhibition introduces Hong Kong’s shipbuilding and ship repair industry

Thanks to the favourable anchorage conditions of Hong Kong, the city quickly developed into a shipping hub in the mid-19th century, and the related shipbuilding and ship repair industry boomed as well. After decades of social and economic development, those dockyards, which had once sprung up along the coasts of Hong Kong Island and Kowloon, are now located at the western part of Victoria Harbour, where they continue to serve the city’s shipping industry and economy.

People who are interested in revisiting the glorious history of major dockyards should not miss the exhibition “Dockyards of Hong Kong: Pictorial Exhibition on Hong Kong’s Shipbuilding and Repair Industry”, currently on show at the Hong Kong Museum of History until October 17.

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Bohumil Stepan’s illustrations for Gulliverovy Cesty (Gulliver’s Travels), Prague 1968 on 50watts

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Alexander Kohn’s cover for the March 1949 issue. Phallic spaceships were common on science fiction magazine covers, but here a submarine plays that role. Fantastic Adventures was an American pulp science fiction magazine, published from 1939 to 1953 by Ziff-Davis

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the giant squid project by P H L E G M

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Hydrothermal Worm marine organism imaged on a Quanta SEM via Link Latte 161

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Deep Sea Diver GI Joe by trisha_too_too on Flickr. – via kari-young

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G̩nie bricoleur РPhoto trouv̩e aux puces

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 PORTLAND, OREGON: Birdseye Map, 1890 on Big Map Blog

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Admiral Lord Nelson: “My ships have passed away, but the spirit of my men remains.” – full size

Mizzen Topman: My name’s Katherine. I’m a member of the Maintenance and Sail Crew at the Maritime Museum of San Diego, where I get to work on and help sail the lovely ships there, including the Star of India, Californian, and HMS Surprise. This blog contains an array of nautical things that I enjoy, and hopefully you do too! – see my blog on spiffingsailor.tumblr.com

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The ‘Duke of Wellington‘ at Castle’s Yard, Charleton by National Maritime Museum on Flickr – v moewie

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egon schiele via sailorjunkers

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HMS Minotaur – British Broadside Ironclad, 1868 (more photos)

Closeup photograph of the ship’s bow, taken in port after 1875, showing crewmen, anchor and mooring chains, bowsprit rigging and bow decorations.  U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph – via architecturalarbiter

HMS Minotaur was the lead ship of the Minotaur class armoured frigates built for the Royal Navy during the 1860s. They were the longest single-screw warships ever built. Minotaur took nearly four years between her launching and commissioning because she was used for evaluations of her armament and different sailing rigs. The ship spent the bulk of her active career as flagship of the Channel Fleet, including during Queen Victoria’s Golden Jubilee Fleet Review in 1887. She became a training ship in 1893 and was then hulked in 1905 when she became part of the training school at Harwich. Minotaur was renamed several times before being sold for scrap in 1922 and broken up the following year.

more on wiki

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“Over-Weighted”

Punch cartoon on the subject of ironclads from 1876. Left, Neptune; Right, Britannia – see full size

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Barbette of the French ironclad Vauban (1882-1905)

French National Museum of the Marine of Toulon – painting by Paul Jazet (1848-1918) see full size

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HMS Inflexible (1876)

(with the pole masts fitted in 1885, replacing the original full sailing rig)

HMS Inflexible was a Victorian ironclad battleship carrying her main armament in centrally placed turrets. The ship was constructed in the 1870s for the Royal Navy to oppose the perceived growing threat from the Italian Regia Marina in the Mediterranean.

Packed with innovations, Inflexible mounted larger guns than those of any previous British warship and had the thickest armour ever to be fitted to a Royal Navy ship. Controversially, she was designed so that if her un-armoured ends should be seriously damaged in action and become water-logged, the buoyancy of the armoured centre section of the ship would keep her afloat and upright.

The ship was the first major warship to depend in part for the protection of her buoyancy by a horizontal armoured deck below the water-line rather than armoured sides along the waterline.

more on wiki

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Hindhead, Surrey; Sailor’s Grave postcard c 1910

The Unknown Sailor was an anonymous seafarer murdered in September 1786 at Hindhead in Surrey, England. His murderers were hanged in chains on Gibbet Hill, Hindhead the following year.  MORE

SEE ALSO: Gibbert HillThe ArrestThe DeedThe “Red Lion”Hindhead, Gibbert Cross

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bestposterart  – by way of dirtyriver airlines

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Amazing Stories, June, 1945 on The Gilded Century

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Richard Müller, Teasing, 1912 – Emotions of Dependency on Weimer

Pluto‘s Playmate (1941) – via mudwerks


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Maritime Monday is compiled every week by Monkey Fist

Monkey Fist is a smack-talking, potty mouthed, Yankee hating, Red Sox fan in Portland, Maine.  In addition to compiling Maritime Monday, she blogs about nautical art, history, and marine science on Adventures of the Blackgang and The Scuttlefish

Submit story ideas, news links, photographs, or items of interest to her at [email protected].  She can also out-belch any man.

The Maritime Monday Archives

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narwal by Lisa Frank
submitted by Capt. Richard Rodriguez

Maritime Monday is brought to you as a public service by the fine folks at gcaptain.