Maritime Monday: Week ending August 14, 2011

Monkey Fist
Total Views: 10
August 14, 2011

A Steaming Cup of English

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Baby Ruth Wins the Warposted by x-ray delta oneOriginal (964 x 1402)

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(left) Straits between Denmark and Sweden 1801 – via fuckyeahcartography

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(right) Ron Thompson, I Like Big Boats, and I Cannot Lievia seamonkeyscandotricks

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Travel Norway. The Architectural Wayvia sealust

In 2005, Norway initiated a massive 15-year agenda to generate more tourism. The government turned to architects and designers to concept and build tourist routes and architectural rest stops to enhance the experience of the stunning Norwegian landscape. The ongoing project has been aptly named, The National Tourist Routes In Norway, and features an array of architects. moremoremore »

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HMS BARFLEUR

QUEEN VICTORIA’S NAVY: a photographic tour of the pride of the Royal Navy from 1867 to 1897 »

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Yorkshire fails yet again to perfect the flying barge
Thornes Wharfe, Aire and Clader Navigation, Wakefield, UK. 13th August 2011.

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Hill’s Cigarettes “Warships & Their Crests” series of 25 issued in 1901 – cigcardpix

Cigarette Card HMS RenownCigarette Card HMS AriadneCigarette Card HMS Sans Pareil

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Montreal, Quebec and Saguenay Steamship leaving Montreal Harbour

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H.M.S. Polyphemus (1881)

Closeup of Polyphemus’ ram in drydock; it contained her bow topedo tube. Twin rudders under the bow were to assist in steering when backing off after a ramming attack; also improved the ship’s turning radius.

more: Polyphemus Photos, Plans & Specifications »

The missing link between ship and submarine, probably one of the pinnacles of Victorian naval experimentation, and something any steam punk writer would have given his or her right arm to have come up with as a concept.

HMS Polyphemus (named after the gigantic one-eyed son of Poseidon and Thoosa in Greek mythology) was the last example of the belief in ramming as the decisive form of naval warfare. Any ancient Greek or Persian Trireme commander would have loved it.

more: Excerpt from The Navy and Army Illustrated, Vol 6 April 9th 1898 »

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(left) The Story of RMS Queen Mary  —  (right) British Seamen (1943) By David Mathew. Published by William Collins of London, 1943. Part of the Britain In Pictures/The British People In Pictures series.

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Molyneux (Woolwich Free Ferry) postcard of Hutton : UK Ports, Piers, Lighthouse

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vintage postcard: Touques at le Havre – (full size) – more »

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Trinity House lightship South Goodwin at Harwich – Photo: © Ian Boyle – Trinity House Lightships »

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Postcard showing the boat harbour at Falmouth, CornwallSent 19 October 1970

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Wills’s Cigarettes “Seaside Resorts” series of 50 with 6 different advertising backs, issued 1899 #25 Penzance, Cornwall  see also: Torquay in 1899Lynmouth in 1899

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at sea“Prehistoric Birds & Reptiles,” vintage 1961 book. Illustration by Zdenek Burian – Original (2724 x 1854)

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Langaki No 470 Passage au pont de Kasr el Nil – The British Museum

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British GLORY – Glass negative; Library of Congress SEE FULL SIZE

HMS Glory was a Canopus-class Pre-dreadnought battleship launched in 1899. She was renamed HMS Crescent in 1920 when she became a depot ship, and was broken up in 1922. HMS Glory and her five sister ships were designed for service in the Far East, where the new rising power Japan was beginning to build a powerful and dangerous navy, and to able to transit the Suez Canal. They were designed to be smaller (by about 2,000 tons), lighter, and faster than their predecessors.

The Canopus class ships were the first British battleships with water-tube boilers, which generated more power at less expense in weight compared with the cylindrical boilers used in previous ships. The new boilers led to the adoption of fore-and-aft funnels, rather than the side-by-side funnel arrangement used in may previous British battleships. The Canopus-class ships proved to be good steamers, consuming 10 tons of coal per hour at full speed, with a high speed for battleships of their time, a full two knots faster than their predecessors.

MORE ON WIKI

see also: MARS

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Bermuda was one of the earliest tourism hot spots in the Caribbean. Before the jet age, only the rich could afford to visit Bermuda–here are the luxurious ways by which they arrived…

Bermuda: Getting There Was Half the Fun now on scuttlefish

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HMS Royal Sovereign (1891)

HMS Royal Sovereign was a Royal Sovereign-class battleship of the Royal Navy, the lead ship of the class, and the largest warship in the world at the time of her construction. The ships were designed by Sir William White and were the most potent battleships in the world until HMS Dreadnought rendered them obsolete in 1906. In their day, the Royal Sovereigns embodied revolutionary improvements in firepower, armour, and speed.

A special meeting of the Board of Admiralty was convened in 1888 to determine the necessary characteristics for the next generation of battleship. Previous ideas of the importance of torpedo or rams as weapons were no longer considered important so the ships were designed as gun platforms. It was necessary to armour the ships as well as possible against return gunfire, but also important to create ships with good seagoing qualities for operations in all weathers at high speeds, and to have regard for long endurance of coal supplies.

However, they tended to develop a heavy roll in some conditions, and after HMS Resolution rolled badly in heavy seas in 1893 the entire class was nicknamed the “Rolling Ressies”, a name which stuck even though the problem was quickly corrected by the fitting of bilge keels. Despite their greatly increased weight, they were the fastest capital ships in the world in their time.

more on wiki  –  see also: Russian booklet with large scale photos of the ship and crew

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Glass Beach at Fort Bragg in California

Glass Beach is an unusual beach in MacKerricher State Park near Fort Bragg, California that is abundant in sea glass created from years of dumping garbage by the residents near the coastline. Glass Beach is a unique beach, not because it was made by man, but because of the way nature has reclaimed a garbage dump, and how time and the pounding surf have corrected one of man’s mistakes.

Beginning in 1949, the area around Glass Beach became a public dump. Fort Bragg residents threw whatever household garbage they had over the cliffs above and into what is now Glass Beach. Now, over 30 years later, nature has reclaimed this beach. Years of pounding waves have cleansed the beach, wearing down the discarded glass into the small, smooth, colored trinkets that cover the beach today.

more

see also: Bubble Baba Challenge 2011: Rafting on Sex Dolls

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Canal boat family, 1920s – Fellows, Morton & Clayton were a famous canal carrying firm. Work and Workers, Arthur O. Cooke, (T.C. and E.C. Jack Ltd., c.1920s.) — Fellows Morton & Clayton Ltd was, for much of the early 20th century, the largest and best-known canal transportation company in England. The company was in existence from 1889 to 1947.

more on Wikipedia

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HMS EMPRESS OF INDIA in dry dock at Chatham Dockyard

QUEEN VICTORIA’S NAVY: a photographic tour of the pride of the Royal Navy from 1867 to 1897 »

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Punch – June 3rd 1946 – posted by old school paul

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The Triumph 308 [September 13th, 1930]Nelson Lee v1 185 [December 21, 1918]posted by Jim Barker

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 tourist guide to Hastings; 1936more

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The Battle of Copenhagen painted by Nicholas Pocock – British bomb vessels are in the foreground, lower left; to the right are the British and Danish ships in line-of-battle formations, the city of Copenhagen in the background.

The Battle of Copenhagen was an engagement which saw a British fleet under the command of Admiral Sir Hyde Parker fight and strategically defeat a Danish-Norwegian fleet anchored just off Copenhagen on 2 April 1801. Vice-Admiral Horatio Nelson led the main attack. He famously disobeyed Parker’s order to withdraw, destroying many of the Dano-Norwegian ships before a truce was agreed. Copenhagen is often considered to be Nelson’s hardest-fought battle.

More on wiki

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H.M.S. Captain by Geoff Hunt

HMS Captain was a 74-gun third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 26 November 1787 at Limehouse. Burned and broken up, 1813  more on wiki »

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Steamship “Mapourika” under repair at Greymouth 8 December 1898National Library NZ on flickr

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There are 10 Nautili from the 20,000 Leagues ride at the Magic Kingdom (bulldozed in a crime against all humanity), and they’re now in a boneyard, although one was used at MGM studios and another is in the ocean at Disney’s Castaway Island.   –link

See also: A great background page on the ride, including the driver’s prank where they ram two subs together to stage an accident: (via coldisthesea)

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HMS MAGNIFICIENT in dock showing stern walkway

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Cunard Line’s SAMARIA enters London’s Royal Docks

PORT OF LONDON 1962 — Michael Bowyer recalls a trip he made in the early 1960s to see the ships in London’s Royal Docks as a passenger on one of the regular dock cruises operated from Tower Pier by the Port of London Authority. Those having sailed out of the Port of London will recall the almost never-ending rows of fine ships from many of Britain’s once formidable shipping lines. Article taken from the April 2003 edition of SHIPS MONTHLY. Britain’s finest International magazine for ship lovers…  MORE

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Chinese-American Shipbuilder

Los Angeles, Calif. — Miss Ethel Mildred Lee, 23-year-old girl born in this country of Chinese parents, is shown at her job as an electrician-helper at the Los Angeles yards of the California Shipbuilding Corporation, where she has worked for almost two years.

Extra incentives to help the war effort are two brothers in the U.S. Army and one in the Navy yard at Honolulu, Hawaii. Miss Lee, who’s 4 feet 10 inches tall and weighs 98 pounds, buys $100 worth or War Bonds a month. — January 20, 1944

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Steamship Katahdin; Maine

The MV Mount Katahdin of 1914 sails on Moosehead Lake. The Bath Iron Works-built ship served as a log drive vessel as well as providing summer excursions. It is owned and operated by the Moosehead Maritime Museum. It’s outward appearance adheres closely to its lake steamer roots. Available for cruises. – Landlocked lake steamers of North America

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vintage postcard – Olympia at the Battle of Manila Bay.

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My husband, a commercial pilot in his work life, is occupied in his free time with all things mechanical … cars, motorcycles, perpetual motion pendulums, among others… but he never seems more free than when he is breaking the laws of nature with only his own body.

— By Abbey Marie Schneider (from “Open Theme”) – (via bluewaterblackheart)

Submit now to Pictory’s Open Themes

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Aqua Photo (Paris) postcard of Helv̩tie (2), ex-G.Escher on the Lac de Neuch̢tel Рfull size

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OCTO-QUAD by JTO / jtojto

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A New England Classic

Sperry Top-Sider is the original brand of boat shoe designed in 1935 by Paul Sperry. Top-Siders were the first boat shoes introduced into the boating market and have never left.  Sperry was an avid boater who, like most boaters, risked injury while walking on the slippery deck of his boat. His successful design was inspired by his cocker spaniel, Prince. While watching Prince run across the ice on a winter’s day in Connecticut, he noticed his dog’s amazing ability to maintain traction on the slippery surface. The pattern of grooves or cracks on his dog’s feet gave him the idea for a leather upper-shoe with a herringbone pattern of grooves on the sole.

Sperry’s shoe quickly became popular with boaters not only for its non-slip sole but also for its white color, which prevented the shoe from leaving marks on a boat’s deck. The shoe remained a niche product until 1939 when the U.S. Navy negotiated the right to manufacture the shoe for its sailors. As a result of the Navy contract, Sperry’s business was purchased by the U.S. Rubber Co., which then marketed the shoe across the country. (via drtuesdaygjohnson)

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Life in Scotland (via coldisthesea)

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Songs that mention ships »

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mermaids & anchor tattoo by Susana Alonsovia hellyeahmermaids


Maritime Monday is compiled by Monkey Fist

Monkey Fist is a smack-talking, potty mouthed, Yankee hating, Red Sox fan in Portland, Maine.  In addition to compiling Maritime Monday, she blogs about nautical art, history, and marine science on Adventures of the Blackgang and The Scuttlefish

Submit story ideas, news links, photographs, or items of interest to her at [email protected].  She can also out-belch any man.

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