Maritime Monday 247 for January 16, 2011

Monkey Fist
Total Views: 25
January 17, 2011

Rendez-vous à Rio starring Brigitte Bardot (original)

Le phare de La Jument /  “La Jument” Lighthouse – Ushant island, Brittany, France

photo by Brestitude (via bluewaterblackheart)

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Ernest Planck– Steam Powered River Boat 12 inch c.1885 – via lushlight

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Funnel – The funnel on the Cleveland Cliffs Steamship Company’s William G. Mather at Cleveland, OH. Photo by Rick –  below: Steam Turbine

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Sea Mine via themurkydepths

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Sir Henry Bessemer, President of the Iron and Steel Institute of Great Britain, besides inventing the process of steel production which bears his name, also spent a fortune on trying to eliminate seasickness from the Channel crossing. Read more about the Bessemer Ship

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‘Sea-sick, sea-sick, oh what fun.’ on WW2inColor

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Volund Bergen – 1907 – Cape Blomidon

This photographic postcard is a good example of a ship run aground, fortunately on a gentle beach in calm weather in the Minas Basin of the Annapolis Valley. Spectators have gathered and have posed for a photo op.  Maritime Museum of the Atlantic

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Another dolphin encounter today. more on incurable

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South Crillon Glacier and Canoe, Alaska — Bradford Washburn, 1934 on forgottencorners

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The Death of Mocha Dick by Randall Enos

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The Ship by Eredel

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This guy’s stuff reminds me of the sea creature drawings on the medieval maps.

joncarling:  ‘searching fish’  2011 –  Prints Available

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At The Docks – by Noble Gill

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Sentinel II and Clipper Costel

This was us passing the Clipper Costell. We could have passed as little as 60 feet . the mate and bosun can be seen on the bow. We got stuck a few hundred metres ahead, but worked free the following morning on the high tide. The Costell had to wait afew more days till tugs came from Cayenne, French Guiane.

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Lamport & Holt Cruise Line, 1912 – One of the most enduring symbols of the 1901 Pan-American Exposition is the image of North and South America symbolized by two women whose flowing dresses form the shapes of the continents and whose hands are joined over Central America. The original painting was by Lockport, NY artist, Raphael Beck (1859-1947).   More on mudwerks

[see also: 1923 Monroe Doctrine Commemorative Half Dollar]

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The [horned] sea stars are usually colored in shades of red or brown, but can be light tan, the color of cookie dough. This appearance, combined with the small horns on its dorsal side, give the sea star a look similar to that of a bumpy cookie.  via letsbeseamonsters

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Monkey’s Retinal Crush of the Week: JTO JTO, or Two Blogs by Jeff Owens

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Battle of Chesma (1881)full resolution‎ 1,407 × 1,500

IVAN KONSTANTINOVICH AIVAZOVSKY – 1817–1900: was a Russian painter of Armenian descent living and working in Crimea, most famous for his seascapes, which constitute more than half of his paintings.  more on Wiki see also: Ship in the Stormy Sea and Shipwreck

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Big Boatphoto by Kevin T. Houlesee also: Ore Dock

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New Directions by OneEighteen

Anybody thinking about changing course for the new year? Sometimes it’s the right thing to do; staying on the old course would run you aground. Unfortunately you can only be sure of that in retrospect. There’s no chart for what’s ahead and the obstacles and paths are obscure.

keep reading

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Holland Perzische Golf Lijn / Holland Persian Gulf Line

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Dreaming of pirates ships and rumphoto by Captain Manta

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Stag Men’s magazine- Feb 1955 via PopKulture

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der Woopsie-gemachen – Tanker capsizes on the Rhine River near St. Goarshausen, 1/13/2011.

via fuckyeahwrecks

imageAtlas of Remote Islands: Fifty Islands I Have Never Set Foot On and Never Will

by Judith Schalansky, 2010.

If my readers are anything like me, an entire volume of remote and tiny outcroppings and their history, legends, lore and evocative locations outlined in full is hard to resist.  This is a lovely map-filled work, perfect for the armchair dreamer.

From the jacket: 

“In this atlas, Judith Schalansky takes us on a journey to fifty far-flung worlds—from Tristan de Cunha to Clipperton-Atoll, from Christmas Island to Easter Island—telling stories of stranded slaves and lonely naturalists, aberrant explorers and weathered lighthouse keepers, forgotten ships and mutinous sailors.”

via book-aesthete

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Boatswains and Bacteremia: Watercolor Images from The Battle of Waterloo

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(via issafly)

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Ship’s telegraph at the Wisconsin Maritime Museum – photo by Mark Ludwig

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The seven masted schooner Thomas W. Lawson from paperpirates

The Thomas W. Lawson was a seven-masted, steel-hulled schooner originally planned for the Pacific trade, but then used primarily to haul coal and oil along the East Coast of the United States. Built in 1902, the ship holds the distinction of being the largest schooner and the largest pure sailing vessel (without an auxiliary engine) ever built. Larger sailing vessels with auxiliary engines for propulsion were the French France II (1911) and German R. C. Rickmers (1906), both five-masted barques.

The Thomas W. Lawson was destroyed off the uninhabited island of Annet, in the Scilly Isles, in a storm on December 14, 1907, killing all but two of her 18 crew including the pilot who was already aboard ship.

more on Wiki

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Mauldin at War, 1943-1945 —  Star Spangled Banter by Sgt. Bill Mauldin, 1944

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Window display at Cuttysark Nautical Antiques and Flags in Seattle, WA

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“Ferry ‘Cross The Mersey” (Gerry and the Pacemakers) via coldisthesea

See the video

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fishing net, Normandy FR via vertbois

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No Mooring sign, the Seine, Paris

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Roll on, thou deep and dark blue ocean-roll!
Ten thousand fleets sweep over thee in vain;
Man marks the earth with ruin-his control
Stops with the shore;-upon the watery plain
The wrecks are all thy deed, nor doth remain
A shadow of man’s ravage, save his own,
When for a moment, like a drop of rain,
He sinks into thy depths with bubbling groan,
Without a grave, unknell’d, uncoffin’d, and unknown.

—Lord Byron

(via bigwaves)

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Sailors Sleeping in Hammocks

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The Embrace by John Fellowvia thingsihappentolike

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DANI TORRENT’S ART

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World War II – Propaganda Posters

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The Ship That Never Sailed; PLYMOUTH CORDAGE COMPANY

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Ship’s cat with Royal Navy officer found photo – via mudwerks

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Yuki Koi postcard Mermaid – via bluewaterblackheart

Monkey Fist is a smack-talking, potty mouthed, Yankee hating, Red Sox fan in Portland, Maine.  In addition to compiling Maritime Monday, she blogs about nautical art, history, and marine science on Adventures of the Blackgang. Submit story ideas, news links, photographs, or items of interest to her at [email protected].  She can also out-belch any man.

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