image

C is for Comic Book

image

Unique River Ships of the Past on English Russia

image

The Wreck of the E.C. Waters; a barebones monument to greed

E.C. Waters was one of the first entrepreneurs to make a buck off of the natural, and not so natural, resources available in Yellowstone National Park. He created his burgeoning enterprise on Yellowstone Lake with a successful passenger steamship, The Zillah, in 1891 and increased it by creating a wild game show–full of buffalo exported from the main-land…

image rt: Steamer E.C. Waters, Yellowstone Lake

see also: Mummies of Vác, Hungary

http://www.bigmapblog.com/maps/map03/tt/TKYXghgaVBJGzqgc_TT.jpg

Strait of Juan de Fuca showing wrecks (1895) on Big Map blog

image

Henry Wellge’s birdseye map of Duluth, Minnesota in 1887 on Big Map blog

Venice by Wagner and Debes (1886) on Big Map blog

image

Kin Diesel Engine

The only diesel engine designed and built by Kincaids. Engine fitted for the MV KINDIESEL. built by Ardrossan Dockyard, Yard No 361. c.1936  Original (1600 x 1281)

image

Kincaids steam engines Image shows at least 7 steam engines, mainly triple expansion engines in the E shop, East Hamilton Street works. c.1920

more on ballasttrust

image

Will’s Capstan Cigarettes advertisement – Quarter-page advertisement from Woman And Home magazine, August 1944

image

Ocean Secret, paperback cover 1907

image

Mount Edgcumbe

Laid down in 1816 at Woolwich as a Southampton class frigate, she was launched as HMS Winchester with 52 guns in 1822. She was removed from her active service in 1861 and renamed as HMS Conway, a role she served until 1876. In 1876 she became Mount Edgcumbe, an industrial training ship for homeless and destitute boys. She retained that role, anchored off Saltash, until 1921 when she was sold and broken up at Plymouth(3842 x 2881)


The ship was originally stationed on the Mersey near Liverpool, then moved to the Menai Strait during World War II. While being towed back to Birkenhead for a refit in 1953, she ran aground and was wrecked, and later burned. The school moved to purpose-built premises on Anglesey where it continued for another twenty years.

more on wiki

image

image

HMS Conway; The Fateful Journey

image

“Last Voyage of HMS Conway” signed by the Artist Tom Harland

image

This photograph was taken by my Grandfather of the HMS Conway at the Menai Bridge where she broke her back

image

“HMS Conway in her days on the Mersey off New Ferry, and the “Conway boys” onboard the ship.” The Community Website of New Ferry, Wirral, UK

image

“HMS Conway, anchored in Bangor in Wales. It’s not the best photo and it wasn’t the sunniest of days, but the picture was taken for a reason; later that day my dad boarded the Conway and began his naval training. When my daughter saw this picture she thought my dad had been a pirate (and I’m sure my childhood would have been much more exciting if he had been).”

Understanding History When It Was News; Nigel Blackwell

image

HMS Worcester (more images)

HMS Worcester was the London maritime interests’ answer to HMS Conway which had been established in 1859 on the River Mersey as a training ship for Liverpool’s burgeoning merchant fleet. Throughout their history Worcester and Conway were competitors, and the two met regularly on playing fields and in boats in keen sporting rivalry.

image

The SS Great Eastern beached to be broken up

Isambard Kingdom Brunel‘s SS Great Eastern was beached at Rock Ferry for breaking up in 1889, which took eighteen months to complete.

image

Charles Dixon RI (1872-1934). Watercolour. Signed and annotated “HMS INDEFATIGABLE, Guard Ship, Cowes, Aug 1912 –maritimeprints.com

image

Charles Dixon RI (1872-1934). Watercolour. Signed, dated 1912, annotated “Spithead July 8th 1912; with INDEFATIGABLE, NEPTUNE and THUNDERER”

image

HMS Indefatigable; payday

see also: starboard quarter shot

image

RMS CelticRMS Saxonia (click thru for full size)
Shipping postcards posted by totallymystified

RMS Celtic (1901)RMS Celtic was an ocean liner owned by the White Star Line. The first ship larger than the SS Great Eastern in gross tonnage, Celtic was the first of a quartet of ships over 20,000 tons, dubbed The Big Four. Launched on 4 April 1901 from the Harland and Wolff shipyards in Belfast, and set off on her maiden voyage from Liverpool to New York on 26 July.

At the beginning of the First World War, Celtic was converted into an armed merchant cruiser however, since the vessel had a high fuel consumption it was decided to convert her into a troop ship in January 1916, when she was used to carry soldiers to Egypt.

In 1917, Celtic struck a mine off the Isle of Man. Seventeen people on board were killed, but the Celtic survived. In March 1918, U-Boat UB-77 torpedoed Celtic in the Irish Sea. Six people on board were killed, but again Celtic remained afloat, eventually the damaged vessel was towed to Liverpool and repaired again.

more

RMS Saxonia (1954) – The second RMS Saxonia was a 21,637 gross-ton passenger ship of the Cunard Line; built by John Brown and Company of Clydebank, Scotland and launched on 17 February 1954. She served with Cunard until 1962 when she was refitted and renamed RMS Carmania. She continued transatlantic crossings and various cruise routes until she was laid up in 1971. In August 1973 she was bought by the Soviet Union-based Black Sea Shipping Company and renamed SS Leonid Sobinov. Scrapped in Alang, India in 1999.

more

Saxonia on simplonpc.co.uk – RMS Celtic (another view) -

The S.S. Celtic is (postcard) pictured at the landing stage in Liverpool when this White Star liner was in regular service sailing from Liverpool. Until 1903 the Celtic was the largest ship in the world. In September 1904 she carried 2,957 passengers westbound. Her passenger accommodation had been altered to: 350-1st Class, 250-2nd Class and 1000-3rd Class. more

image

passengers aboard RMS Celtic, June 1927

image

The Celtic: “After the war she returned to the Atlantic route and on 10 Dec 1928 she called at Queenstown on the way from New York. Conditions were heavy from the south west and the Celtic ran aground on the rocks on the southern side of Roches Point…”  more on SailCork

image

SS Celtic (1872) – The first shit to carry the name was a steamship built for the White Star Line by shipbuilders Harland and Wolff of Belfast. The new ship was originally supposed to be named the Arctic, but since the American Collins Line had had a paddle-wheel steamer with that name which had sunk in 1854, the White Star management changed their minds, and settled on the name Celtic.

In 1880, a young officer named Edward Smith, who later became the Line’s most celebrated Captain, and the Captain of Titanic, joined the crew of Celtic as her Fourth Officer.

On 19 May 1887, at about 5:25 in the afternoon, the Celtic collided with the White Star liner Britannic in thick fog about 350 miles (560 km) east of Sandy Hook, New Jersey. The Celtic, with 870 passengers, had been steaming westbound for New York City, while the Britannic, carrying 450 passengers, was on the second day of her eastward journey to Liverpool. The two ships collided at almost right angles, with the Celtic burying her prow 10 feet (3 m) in the aft port side of Britannic. The Celtic rebounded and hit two more times, before sliding past behind Britannic…

more / image source (1426×867

image

COLLISION BETWEEN THE S. S. CELTIC AND THE BRITANNIC
Illustrated London News , June 11, 1887

The two ships collided in the fog about three hundred miles of Sandy Hook on the 19th of May 1887 when the Celtic rammed the Britannic twice. Both ships were in good enough condition to make it under their own steam into the New York Harbor. However, four of the Britannic’s steerage passengers were killed and about thirteen injured. The deaths and injuries all occurred on the ship’s deck. No one was thrown overboard and drown.

An article in the New York Times says the Celtic was headed to New York and the Britannic was on the second day out on her voyage to Liverpool. Six passengers on the Britannic were killed almost immediately by falling “bars and plates of iron” and several were swept overboard and drowned. 12 lives were lost and about 20 persons injured… source

image

RMS Saxonia (1899)

The first RMS Saxonia was a passenger ship of the British Cunard Line. Between 1900 and 1925, she operated on North Atlantic and Mediterranean passenger routes, and she saw military service during World War I.

In the late 1890s, the Cunard Line faced tight competition from the German Norddeutscher Lloyd company and the British White Star Line and the threat of a possible takeover by the aggressively acquisitive American International Mercantile Marine Company (IMM).

Saxonia was steam-powered, with her two propellers powered by quadruple expansion engines, and had a service speed of 15 knots (28 km/h). She had a long, black hull, a low, well-balanced superstructure, and four masts. Saxonia had a single funnel which was 106 feet (32.3 m) tall, probably the tallest funnel ever installed on a passenger ship. Saxonia had a large cargo capacity, so much so that her passenger accommodations were smaller than most people expected for a liner of her size.

Constructed at the John Brown & Company shipyard at Clydebank, Scotland, Saxonia was launched on 16 December 1899. She completed fitting out in mid-May 1900…

more

image

RMS Saxonia; Early incarnation of the ship’s bridge, as viewed from the bow
more on Pride of the Clyde

image

Mudeford Ferry Boats / Original (1624 x 1016)

Mudeford (/ˈmʌdɨfərd/) was originally a small fishing village in the borough of Christchurch, Dorset southern England, lying at the entrance to Christchurch Harbour. Mudeford Quay was constructed in the late 1940s. Prior to this, The Haven, as it was then known was surrounded by sloping beaches.

A specially built lifeboat was stationed at Mudeford from 1802, privately owned and manned by the local fisherman. In 1809, a troopship carrying 100 soldiers returning from the Peninsular War, sank in Christchurch Bay. The whole complement was saved by fishermen from the village.

The area was historically much involved in smuggling and the site in 1784 of The Battle of Mudeford. George III is recorded as having visited Mudeford in 1801 and using a bathing machine.

The Mudeford ferry operates between the Quay and Mudeford Sandbank on Hengistbury Head. The ferry was until the 1960s operated by rowing boats with payment being at the discretion of the passenger.  more

smuggling around Mudeford

image

Mudeford Ferry today

image

Brighton; Grand Junction Road 1900

image

Brighton Pier today (taken Sunday, July 15th, 2012 by The Snark)

image

watercolour from just after WW2 showing Westminster Bridge and a tug with an articulated funnel steaming upstreamOriginal (963 x 1503)

image

Triang & Minic Toys; pair of clockwork Boats

HMS Pretoria Castle (F61) was an armed merchant cruiser and escort aircraft carrier of the Royal Navy that saw service during World War II. She had previously been the ocean liner Pretoria Castle of the Union-Castle Line; built at Harland & Wolff shipyards in Belfast, Northern Ireland and launched in 1938.

requisitioned by the Royal Navy in October 1939, and converted to an armed merchant cruiser with 6-inch (150 mm) and 3-inch (76 mm) guns, entering service in November 1939, serving mainly in the South Atlantic.

Post-war, the ship was sold back to the Union-Castle Line in 1946 and converted back to a passenger liner, being renamed the Warwick Castle and operating on routes from England to South Africa. She was eventually sold and scrapped in Barcelona in 1962.

more

Union-Castle Line on simplonpc.co.uk

image

HMS Pretoria Castle

image

Wartime Sports: Fencing on the HMS Pretoria Castle, WW2

image

Harbour, Poole (original 1636 x 956)

Poole is a large coastal town and seaport in the county of Dorset, on the south coast of England. The earliest recorded use of the town’s name was in the 12th century when the town began to emerge as an important port, prospering with the introduction of the wool trade.

In later centuries the town had important trade links with North America and at its peak in the 18th century it was one of the busiest ports in Britain. During the Second World War the town was one of the main departing points for the D-Day landings of the Normandy Invasion.

Poole is a tourist resort, attracting visitors with its large natural harbour, history, the Lighthouse arts centre and beaches. The town has a busy commercial port with cross-Channel freight and passenger ferry services. The headquarters of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) are located in Poole, and the Royal Marines have a base in the town’s harbour.

image

The Poole Logboat, a 2,000 year old monoxylon discovered during dredging works in Poole Harbour.

The boat is over 2,200 years old and is estimated through carbon dating to have been constructed around 300–200 BCE. The Iron Age vessel was unearthed in 1964 during dredging work in Poole Harbour.


Poole experienced two large-scale Viking invasions c. 876, Guthrum sailed his fleet through the harbour to attack Wareham, and in 1015, Canute began his conquest of England in Poole Harbour, using it as a base to raid and pillage Wessex. Poole’s growing importance was recognised in 1433 when it was awarded staple port status by King Henry VI.

Poole’s puritan stance and its merchants’ opposition to the ship money tax introduced by King Charles I led to the town declaring for Parliament.

Ship money refers to a tax that Charles I of England tried to levy without the consent of Parliament. This tax, which was only applied to coastal towns during a time of war, was intended to offset the cost of defending that part of the coast, and could be paid in actual ships or the equivalent value.

The collection of the tax inland during peacetime started in 1634 and provoked increasing resistance by 1636. This conflict was one of the causes of the English Civil War.

The town grew rapidly during the industrial revolution as urbanisation took place and the town became an area of mercantile prosperity and overcrowded poverty. At the turn of the 19th century, nine out of ten workers were engaged in harbour activities, but as the century progressed ships became too large for the shallow harbour and the port lost business to the deep water ports at Liverpool, Southampton and Plymouth.

image

image

Poole Quay today — Full resolution ‎(3,456 × 1,944 pixels)

image

3K SES was a “Surface Effect” giant vessel concept from 1979… with projected 3000 ton weight and speed of 100 knots in high seas, and vertical missile launch capability. The History of Hydrofoils

image

Queen of the Sea Restaurant, 45-12 Queens Boulevard, Sunnyside, L.I. City, N. Y.

image

Noordwijk aan Zee; luggage sticker

image

Sean Connery / Vintage German postcard

In 1947 he joined the Royal Navy, but after three years he was discharged on medical grounds because of severe stomach ulcers.

Spied this weekend whilst sailing on Chesapeake Bay – photos by Monkey Fist: abc

Sea Fighter (FSF-1) is an experimental littoral combat ship under development (2005-2008) by the United States Navy. Its hull is of a small-waterplane-area twin-hull (SWATH) design, provides exceptional stability, even on rough seas.

For power, it can use either its dual gas turbine engines for speed or its dual diesel engines for efficient cruising. Helicopters can land and launch on its deck. Smaller water craft can be carried and launched from its stern.

The vessel is being developed under the program title Littoral Surface Craft-Experimental (LSC(X)) with a hull type designation Fast Sea Frame. The first vessel has been assigned the hull classification symbol FSF 1 and also has been referred to as the X-Craft. The vessel was designed by British company BMT Nigel Gee Ltd (formerly BMT Nigel Gee and Associates Ltd) who continue with a role in the development of the vessel.

Sea Fighter is capable of speeds of 50 knots (90 km/h) and greater. The basic design has a displacement of 1,100 tons while measuring 79.9 m (73 m at waterline) long and 22 m broad.

It is designed to be a sea frame that can carry interchangeable mission modules resembling shipping containers. These modules allow it to be easily reconfigured to meet a variety of mission requirements, including mine warfare, anti-submarine operations, amphibious assault support, surface warfare, transport and logistical missions, cruise missile launch, and special forces interdiction operations. The mission modules are easily loaded and stored on Sea Fighter’s inner deck.

The first vessel of the type (FSF 1) was constructed at the Nichols Bros. Boat Builders shipyard at Freeland, Washington, under contract to Titan Corporation, a subsidiary of L-3 Communications. Nichols Shipyard was selected because of their previous experience in the construction of aluminum-hulled high speed ferries.

The Navy and Coast Guard are jointly exploring the possibility of further development of Sea Fighter-type vessels for use in patrolling U.S. coastal waters. With an effective range of 4,400 nautical miles (8,100 km) unrefueled the type could also be deployed quickly overseas for similar duties. Such vessels would be capable of crossing the Atlantic Ocean unrefueled, and have a very low radar signature, making detection difficult.

MORE on wikipedia

see also:

Maintenance and Repair Work Complete on “Sea Fighter” (FSF 1) March 09, 2012

How the FSF-1 Sea Fighter Works

Military Channel :: Explore the FSF-1 Sea Fighter

FSF-1 Sea Fighter: From X-Craft to Serving Ship?

image

retrogasm: Katy Keene (via okdukographicarts)

Tagged with →  
Share →

Sign up for the gCaptain Newsletter!

Over 26,000 people receive the gCaptain email newsletter every single day. Get the maritime and offshore industry headlines that matter sent straight to your inbox. Or LIKE us on Facebook!

We will not share your email address with anybody for any reason